Brief compassion focused imagery for treatment of severe head injury

Campbell, I. N., Gallagher, M., McLeod, H. J. , O'Neill, B. and McMillan, T. M. (2017) Brief compassion focused imagery for treatment of severe head injury. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, (doi:10.1080/09602011.2017.1342663) (PMID:28664763) (Early Online Publication)

Campbell, I. N., Gallagher, M., McLeod, H. J. , O'Neill, B. and McMillan, T. M. (2017) Brief compassion focused imagery for treatment of severe head injury. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, (doi:10.1080/09602011.2017.1342663) (PMID:28664763) (Early Online Publication)

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Abstract

Objective: To determine whether participants with severe head injury (SHI) allocated to a brief compassion focused imagery (CFI) intervention show greater change in compassion than those exposed to relaxation imagery (RI). Method: Participants were exposed to a preparatory video to promote engagement and then randomly allocated to intervention. Pre and post preparatory measures were Motivation for Intervention and Fears of Compassion Scales, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and PANAS. Pre and post intervention self-report measures were the Empathy Quotient, Self-Compassion Scale, STAI and Relaxation Scale. Heart rate variability (HRV) was monitored throughout. Results: Motivation for therapy increased after the preparatory video (z=3.44, p=0.001). Across the intervention, group differences were not found on self-report measures or HRV changes. When CFI and RI groups were pooled, improvement in relaxation (r=.41, p<0.01) and state anxiety (r=.29 p<0.05) were found across the intervention; these outcomes were not associated with changes in self-compassion or HRV. Conclusion: Brief CFI, a central aspect of compassion focussed therapy, did not produce a reliable change in people with SHI. Enhanced motivation for psychological therapy after a brief preparatory video is relevant and underlines the need to understand mechanisms of action rather than the pursuing whole protocol approaches to therapy.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:McLeod, Professor Hamish and McMillan, Professor Thomas
Authors: Campbell, I. N., Gallagher, M., McLeod, H. J., O'Neill, B., and McMillan, T. M.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
Journal Name:Neuropsychological Rehabilitation
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:0960-2011
ISSN (Online):1464-0694
Published Online:30 June 2017
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
First Published:First published in Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 2017
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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