Acutely damaged axons are remyelinated in multiple sclerosis and experimental models of demyelination

Schultz, V. , van der Meer, F., Wrzos, C., Scheidt, U., Bahn, E., Stadelmann, C., Brück, W. and Junker, A. (2017) Acutely damaged axons are remyelinated in multiple sclerosis and experimental models of demyelination. Glia, 65(8), pp. 1350-1360. (doi: 10.1002/glia.23167) (PMID:28560740)

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Abstract

Remyelination is in the center of new therapies for the treatment of multiple sclerosis to resolve and improve disease symptoms and protect axons from further damage. Although remyelination is considered beneficial in the long term, it is not known, whether this is also the case early in lesion formation. Additionally, the precise timing of acute axonal damage and remyelination has not been assessed so far. To shed light onto the interrelation between axons and the myelin sheath during de- and remyelination, we employed cuprizone- and focal lysolecithin-induced demyelination and performed time course experiments assessing the evolution of early and late stage remyelination and axonal damage. We observed damaged axons with signs of remyelination after cuprizone diet cessation and lysolecithin injection. Similar observations were made in early multiple sclerosis lesions. To assess the correlation of remyelination and axonal damage in multiple sclerosis lesions, we took advantage of a cohort of patients with early and late stage remyelinated lesions and assessed the number of APP- and SMI32- positive damaged axons and the density of SMI31-positive and silver impregnated preserved axons. Early de- and remyelinating lesions did not differ with respect to axonal density and axonal damage, but we observed a lower axonal density in late stage demyelinated multiple sclerosis lesions than in remyelinated multiple sclerosis lesions. Our findings suggest that remyelination may not only be protective over a long period of time, but may play an important role in the immediate axonal recuperation after a demyelinating insult.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Schultz, Dr Verena
Authors: Schultz, V., van der Meer, F., Wrzos, C., Scheidt, U., Bahn, E., Stadelmann, C., Brück, W., and Junker, A.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
Journal Name:Glia
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:0894-1491
ISSN (Online):1098-1136
Published Online:31 May 2017
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 The Authors
First Published:First published in Glia 65(8): 1350-1360
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons license

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