Patient preference as a predictor of outcomes in a pilot trial of person-centred counselling versus low-intensity cognitive behavioural therapy for persistent sub-threshold and mild depression

Cooper, M., Messow, C.-M. , McConnachie, A. , Freire, E., Elliott, R., Heard, D., Williams, C. and Morrison, J. (2017) Patient preference as a predictor of outcomes in a pilot trial of person-centred counselling versus low-intensity cognitive behavioural therapy for persistent sub-threshold and mild depression. Counselling Psychology Quarterly, (doi:10.1080/09515070.2017.1329708) (Early Online Publication)

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Abstract

The aim of this analysis was to explore whether pre-treatment intervention preferences were related to outcomes for patients with persistent sub-threshold and mild depression who received one of two treatment types. Thirty-six patients took part in a two-arm, parallel group, pilot randomized controlled trial that compared short term (3 month and 6 month) outcomes of person-centred counselling (PCC) compared with low-intensity, CBT-based guided self-help (LICBT). Patient preferences for the two interventions were assessed at baseline assessment, and analysed as two independent linear variables (pro-PCC, pro-LICBT). Eight out of 30 interactions between baseline treatment preferences and treatment type were found to be significant at the p < .05 level. All were in the predicted direction, with patients who showed a stronger preference for a treatment achieving better outcomes in that treatment compared with the alternative. However, pro-LICBT was a stronger predictor of outcomes than pro-PCC. The findings provide preliminary support that treatment preferences should be taken into account when providing interventions for patients with persistent sub-threshold and mild depression. It is recommended that further research analyses preferences for different treatment types as independent variables, and examines preferences for format of treatment (e.g. guided self-help vs. face-to-face).

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information::This work was supported by the Chief Scientist Office of the Scottish Government under Grant CZH/4/723.
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Messow, Ms Claudia-Martina and McConnachie, Dr Alex and Williams, Professor Christopher and Morrison, Professor Jillian
Authors: Cooper, M., Messow, C.-M., McConnachie, A., Freire, E., Elliott, R., Heard, D., Williams, C., and Morrison, J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Robertson Centre
Journal Name:Counselling Psychology Quarterly
Publisher:Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
ISSN:0951-5070
ISSN (Online):1469-3674
Published Online:26 June 2017
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
First Published:First published in Counselling Psychology Quarterly 2017
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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