Type 2 diabetes and glucose intolerance in a population with intellectual disabilities: the STOP diabetes cross-sectional screening study

Dunkley, A.J., Tyrer, F., Gray, L.J., Bhaumik, S., Spong, R., Chudasama, Y., Cooper, S.-A. , Ganghadaran, S., Davies, M. and Khunti, K. (2017) Type 2 diabetes and glucose intolerance in a population with intellectual disabilities: the STOP diabetes cross-sectional screening study. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 61(7), pp. 668-681. (doi:10.1111/jir.12380) (PMID:28544066)

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Abstract

Background: Adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) may be at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, due to lifestyle factors, medications and other diagnosed conditions. Currently, there is lack of evidence on prevalence and prevention in this population. The aim of this study was to conduct a diabetes screening programme to determine prevalence of previously undiagnosed type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose regulation in people with ID. Methods: Screening was conducted in a variety of community settings in Leicestershire, UK. Adults with ID were invited via: general practices; the Leicestershire Learning Disability Register; ID psychiatric services; and some people directly contacted the research team due to publicity about the study. Screening involved collection of anthropometric, biomedical and questionnaire data. Type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose regulation were defined according to (venous) fasting plasma glucose or HbA1c, following current World Health Organisation criteria. Results: Nine hundred thirty adults (29% of those approached) participated. Mean age was 43 years, 58% were male and 16% of South Asian ethnicity. Most participants were either overweight or obese (68%). Diabetes status was successfully assessed for 675 (73%) participants: Nine (1.3%, 95% confidence interval 0.6 to 2.5) were found to have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes, and 35 (5.2%, 95% confidence interval 3.6 to 7.1) had impaired glucose regulation. Key factors associated with abnormal glucose regulation included the following: non-white ethnicity and a first degree family history of diabetes. Conclusions: Results from this large multi-ethnic cohort suggest a low prevalence of screen-detected (previously undiagnosed) type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose regulation in adults with ID. However, the high levels of overweight and obesity we found emphasise the need for targeted lifestyle prevention strategies, which are specifically tailored for the needs of people with ID.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Cooper, Professor Sally-Ann
Authors: Dunkley, A.J., Tyrer, F., Gray, L.J., Bhaumik, S., Spong, R., Chudasama, Y., Cooper, S.-A., Ganghadaran, S., Davies, M., and Khunti, K.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
Journal Name:Journal of Intellectual Disability Research
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:0964-2633
ISSN (Online):1365-2788
Published Online:21 May 2017
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities andJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd
First Published:First published in Journal of Intellectual Disability Research 61(7): 668-681
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
564611Development of a structured screening and lifestyle intervention for prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus in a population with learning disabilities.Sally-Ann CooperNational Institute for Health Research (NIHR)RP-PG-1209-10057IHW - MENTAL HEALTH & WELLBEING