The role of cholesterol metabolism and various steroid abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders: A hypothesis paper

Gillberg, C. , Fernell, E., Kočovská, E., Minnis, H. , Bourgeron, T., Thompson, L. and Allely, C. S. (2017) The role of cholesterol metabolism and various steroid abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders: A hypothesis paper. Autism Research, 10(6), pp. 1022-1044. (doi:10.1002/aur.1777) (PMID:28401679)

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Abstract

Based on evidence from the relevant research literature, we present a hypothesis that there may be a link between cholesterol, vitamin D, and steroid hormones which subsequently impacts on the development of at least some of the “autisms” [Coleman & Gillberg]. Our hypothesis, driven by the peer reviewed literature, posits that there may be links between cholesterol metabolism, which we will refer to as “steroid metabolism” and findings of steroid abnormalities of various kinds (cortisol, testosterone, estrogens, progesterone, vitamin D) in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Further research investigating these potential links is warranted to further our understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying ASD.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Minnis, Professor Helen and Kocovska, Mrs Eva and Thompson, Dr Lucy and Allely, Dr Clare and Gillberg, Professor Christopher
Authors: Gillberg, C., Fernell, E., Kočovská, E., Minnis, H., Bourgeron, T., Thompson, L., and Allely, C. S.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
Journal Name:Autism Research
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:1939-3792
ISSN (Online):1939-3806
Published Online:12 April 2017
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 The Authors
First Published:First published in Autism Research 10(6): 1022-1044
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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