Mortality and cardiovascular disease in type 1 and type 2 diabetes

Rawshani, A., Rawshani, A., Franzén, S., Eliasson, B., Svensson, A.-M., Miftaraj, M., McGuire, D. K., Sattar, N. , Rosengren, A. and Gudbjörnsdottir, S. (2017) Mortality and cardiovascular disease in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. New England Journal of Medicine, 376(15), pp. 1407-1418. (doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1608664) (PMID:28402770)

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Abstract

Background: Long-term trends in excess risk of death and cardiovascular outcomes have not been extensively studied in persons with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. Methods: We included patients registered in the Swedish National Diabetes Register from 1998 through 2012 and followed them through 2014. Trends in deaths and cardiovascular events were estimated with Cox regression and standardized incidence rates. For each patient, controls who were matched for age, sex, and county were randomly selected from the general population. Results: Among patients with type 1 diabetes, absolute changes during the study period in the incidence rates of sentinel outcomes per 10,000 person-years were as follows: death from any cause, -31.4 (95% confidence interval [CI], -56.1 to -6.7); death from cardiovascular disease, -26.0 (95% CI, -42.6 to -9.4); death from coronary heart disease, -21.7 (95% CI, -37.1 to -6.4); and hospitalization for cardiovascular disease, -45.7 (95% CI, -71.4 to -20.1). Absolute changes per 10,000 person-years among patients with type 2 diabetes were as follows: death from any cause, -69.6 (95% CI, -95.9 to -43.2); death from cardiovascular disease, -110.0 (95% CI, -128.9 to -91.1); death from coronary heart disease, -91.9 (95% CI, -108.9 to -75.0); and hospitalization for cardiovascular disease, -203.6 (95% CI, -230.9 to -176.3). Patients with type 1 diabetes had roughly 40% greater reduction in cardiovascular outcomes than controls, and patients with type 2 diabetes had roughly 20% greater reduction than controls. Reductions in fatal outcomes were similar in patients with type 1 diabetes and controls, whereas patients with type 2 diabetes had smaller reductions in fatal outcomes than controls. Conclusions: In Sweden from 1998 through 2014, mortality and the incidence of cardiovascular outcomes declined substantially among persons with diabetes, although fatal outcomes declined less among those with type 2 diabetes than among controls. (Funded by the Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions and others.).

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Sattar, Professor Naveed
Authors: Rawshani, A., Rawshani, A., Franzén, S., Eliasson, B., Svensson, A.-M., Miftaraj, M., McGuire, D. K., Sattar, N., Rosengren, A., and Gudbjörnsdottir, S.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
Journal Name:New England Journal of Medicine
Publisher:Massachusetts Medical Society
ISSN:0028-4793
ISSN (Online):1533-4406
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 Massachusetts Medical Society
First Published:First published in New England Journal of Medicine 376(15):1407-1418
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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