Clinical actionability of comprehensive genomic profiling for management of rare or refractory cancers

Hirshfield, K. M. et al. (2016) Clinical actionability of comprehensive genomic profiling for management of rare or refractory cancers. Oncologist, 21(11), pp. 1315-1325. (doi:10.1634/theoncologist.2016-0049) (PMID:27566247)

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Abstract

Background. The frequency with which targeted tumor sequencing results will lead to implemented change in care is unclear. Prospective assessment of the feasibility and limitations of using genomic sequencing is critically important. Methods. A prospective clinical study was conducted on 100 patients with diverse-histology, rare, or poor-prognosis cancers to evaluate the clinical actionability of a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-certified, comprehensive genomic profiling assay (FoundationOne), using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumors. The primary objectives were to assess utility, feasibility, and limitations of genomic sequencing for genomically guided therapy or other clinical purpose in the setting of a multidisciplinary molecular tumor board. Results. Of the tumors from the 92 patients with sufficient tissue, 88 (96%) had at least one genomic alteration (average 3.6, range 0–10). Commonly altered pathways included p53 (46%), RAS/RAF/MAPK (rat sarcoma; rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma; mitogen-activated protein kinase) (45%), receptor tyrosine kinases/ligand (44%), PI3K/AKT/mTOR (phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase; protein kinase B; mammalian target of rapamycin) (35%), transcription factors/regulators (31%), and cell cycle regulators (30%). Many low frequency but potentially actionable alterations were identified in diverse histologies. Use of comprehensive profiling led to implementable clinical action in 35% of tumors with genomic alterations, including genomically guided therapy, diagnostic modification, and trigger for germline genetic testing. Conclusion. Use of targeted next-generation sequencing in the setting of an institutional molecular tumor board led to implementable clinical action in more than one third of patients with rare and poor-prognosis cancers. Major barriers to implementation of genomically guided therapy were clinical status of the patient and drug access. Early and serial sequencing in the clinical course and expanded access to genomically guided early-phase clinical trials and targeted agents may increase actionability. Implications for Practice: Identification of key factors that facilitate use of genomic tumor testing results and implementation of genomically guided therapy may lead to enhanced benefit for patients with rare or difficult to treat cancers. Clinical use of a targeted next-generation sequencing assay in the setting of an institutional molecular tumor board led to implementable clinical action in over one third of patients with rare and poor prognosis cancers. The major barriers to implementation of genomically guided therapy were clinical status of the patient and drug access both on trial and off label. Approaches to increase actionability include early and serial sequencing in the clinical course and expanded access to genomically guided early phase clinical trials and targeted agents.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Vazquez Vazquez, Alexei
Authors: Hirshfield, K. M., Tolkunov, D., Zhong, H., Ali, S. M., Stein, M. N., Murphy, S., Vig, H., Vazquez, A., Glod, J., Moss, R. A., Belyi, V., Chan, C. S., Chen, S., Goodell, L., Foran, D., Yelensky, R., Palma, N. A., Sun, J. X., Miller, V. A., Stephens, P. J., Ross, J. S., Kaufman, H., Poplin, E., Mehnert, J., Tan, A. R., Bertino, J. R., Aisner, J., DiPaola, R. S., Rodriguez-Rodriguez, L., and Ganesan, S.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cancer Sciences
Journal Name:Oncologist
ISSN:1083-7159
ISSN (Online):1549-490X
Published Online:26 August 2016
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2016 The Authors
First Published:First published in Oncologist 21(11):1315-1325
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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