Bone and cartilage differentiation of a single stem cell population driven by material interface

Donnelly, H., Smith, C.-A. , Sweeten, P. E., Gadegaard, N. , Meek, D., D'Este, M., Mata, A., Eglin, D. and Dalby, M. J. (2017) Bone and cartilage differentiation of a single stem cell population driven by material interface. Journal of Tissue Engineering, 8, pp. 1-10. (doi:10.1177/2041731417705615) (PMID:28567273) (PMCID:PMC5438107)

Donnelly, H., Smith, C.-A. , Sweeten, P. E., Gadegaard, N. , Meek, D., D'Este, M., Mata, A., Eglin, D. and Dalby, M. J. (2017) Bone and cartilage differentiation of a single stem cell population driven by material interface. Journal of Tissue Engineering, 8, pp. 1-10. (doi:10.1177/2041731417705615) (PMID:28567273) (PMCID:PMC5438107)

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Abstract

Adult stem cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells, are a multipotent cell source able to differentiate towards multiple cell types. While used widely in tissue engineering and biomaterials research, they present inherent donor variability and functionalities. In addition, their potential to form multiple tissues is rarely exploited. Here, we combine an osteogenic nanotopography and a chondrogenic hyaluronan hydrogel with the hypothesis that we can make a complex tissue from a single multipotent cell source with the exemplar of creating a three-dimensional bone–cartilage boundary environment. Marrow stromal cells were seeded onto the topographical surface and the temperature gelling hydrogel laid on top. Cells that remained on the nanotopography spread and formed osteoblast-like cells, while those that were seeded into or migrated into the gel remained rounded and expressed chondrogenic markers. This novel, simple interfacial environment provides a platform for anisotropic differentiation of cells from a single source, which could ultimately be exploited to sort osteogenic and chondrogenic progenitor cells from a marrow stromal cell population and to develop a tissue engineered interface.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:DONNELLY, HANNAH and Meek, Professor Dominic and Gadegaard, Professor Nikolaj and Dalby, Professor Matthew and SWEETEN, Paula and Smith, Mrs Carol-Anne
Authors: Donnelly, H., Smith, C.-A., Sweeten, P. E., Gadegaard, N., Meek, D., D'Este, M., Mata, A., Eglin, D., and Dalby, M. J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Molecular Cell and Systems Biology
College of Science and Engineering > School of Engineering > Biomedical Engineering
Journal Name:Journal of Tissue Engineering
Publisher:SAGE
ISSN:2041-7314
ISSN (Online):2041-7314
Published Online:15 May 2017
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 The Authors
First Published:First published in Journal of Tissue Engineering 8:1-10
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
615571Multiscale topographical modulation of cells and bacteria for next generation orthopaedic implantsMatthew DalbyEngineering & Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)EP/K034898/1RI MOLECULAR CELL & SYSTEMS BIOLOGY