Specialist intervention is associated with improved patient outcomes in patients with decompensated heart failure: evaluation of the impact of a multidisciplinary inpatient heart failure team

Masters, J., Morton, G., Anton, I., Szymanski, J., Greenwood, E., Grogono, J., Flett, A. S., Cleland, J. G.F. and Cowburn, P. J. (2017) Specialist intervention is associated with improved patient outcomes in patients with decompensated heart failure: evaluation of the impact of a multidisciplinary inpatient heart failure team. Open Heart, 4(1), e000547. (doi:10.1136/openhrt-2016-000547) (PMID:28409010) (PMCID:PMC5384462)

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Abstract

Objective: The study aimed to evaluate the impact of a multidisciplinary inpatient heart failure team (HFT) on treatment, hospital readmissions and mortality of patients with decompensated heart failure (HF). Methods: A retrospective service evaluation was undertaken in a UK tertiary centre university hospital comparing 196 patients admitted with HF in the 6 months prior to the introduction of the HFT (pre-HFT) with all 211 patients seen by the HFT (post-HFT) during its first operational year. Results: There were no significant differences in patient baseline characteristics between the groups. Inpatient mortality (22% pre-HFT vs 6% post-HFT; p<0.0001) and 1-year mortality (43% pre-HFT vs 27% post-HFT; p=0.001) were significantly lower in the post-HFT cohort. Post-HFT patients were significantly more likely to be discharged on loop diuretics (84% vs 98%; p=<0.0001), ACE inhibitors (65% vs 76%; p=0.02), ACE inhibitors and/or angiotensin receptor blockers (83% vs 91%; p=0.02), and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (44% vs 68%; p<0.0001) pre-HFT versus post-HFT, respectively. There was no difference in discharge prescription rates of beta-blockers (59% pre-HFT vs 63% post-HFT; p=0.45). The mean length of stay (17±19 days pre-HFT vs 19±18 days post-HFT; p=0.06), 1-year all-cause readmission rates (46% pre-HFT vs 47% post-HFT; p=0.82) and HF readmission rates (28% pre-HFT vs 20% post-HFT; p=0.09) were not different between the groups. Conclusions: The introduction of a specialist inpatient HFT was associated with improved patient outcome. Inpatient and 1-year mortality were significantly reduced. Improved use of evidence-based drug therapies, more intensive diuretic use and multidisciplinary care may contribute to these differences in outcome.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Cleland, Professor John
Authors: Masters, J., Morton, G., Anton, I., Szymanski, J., Greenwood, E., Grogono, J., Flett, A. S., Cleland, J. G.F., and Cowburn, P. J.
Subjects:R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Robertson Centre
Journal Name:Open Heart
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:2053-3624
ISSN (Online):2053-3624
Published Online:08 March 2017
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 The Authors
First Published:First published in Open Heart 4(1):e000547
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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