Does the interaction between cortisol and testosterone predict men's facial attractiveness?

Kandrik, M. , Hahn, A. C. , Han, C. , Wincenciak, J. , Fisher, C. I., Debruine, L. and Jones, B. C. (2017) Does the interaction between cortisol and testosterone predict men's facial attractiveness? Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology, 3(4), pp. 275-281. (doi:10.1007/s40750-017-0064-1)

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Abstract

Although some researchers have suggested that the interaction between cortisol and testosterone predicts ratings of men’s facial attractiveness, evidence for this pattern of results is equivocal. Consequently, the current study tested for a correlation between men’s facial attractiveness and the interaction between their cortisol and testosterone levels. We also tested for corresponding relationships between the interaction between cortisol and testosterone and ratings of men’s facial health and dominance (perceived traits that are correlated with facial attractiveness in men). We found no evidence that ratings of either facial attractiveness or health were correlated with the interaction between cortisol and testosterone. Some analyses suggested that the interaction between cortisol and testosterone levels may predict ratings of men’s facial dominance, however, with testosterone being more closely related to facial dominance ratings among men with higher cortisol. Our results suggest that the relationship between men’s facial attractiveness and the interaction between cortisol and testosterone is not robust.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Han, Mr Chengyang and Hahn, Dr Amanda and Wincenciak, Dr Joanna and Debruine, Professor Lisa and Kandrik, Dr Michal and Jones, Professor Benedict and Fisher, Dr Claire
Authors: Kandrik, M., Hahn, A. C., Han, C., Wincenciak, J., Fisher, C. I., Debruine, L., and Jones, B. C.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology
College of Science and Engineering > School of Psychology
Journal Name:Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:2198-7335
ISSN (Online):2198-7335
Published Online:30 March 2017
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 The Authors
First Published:First published in Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology 3(4)275-281
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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591543ESRC Doctoral Training Centre 2011...Mary Beth KneafseyEconomic & Social Research Council (ESRC)ES/J500136/1VPO VICE PRINCIPAL RESEARCH & ENTERPRISE