Adverse metabolic and mental health outcomes associated with shiftwork in a population-based study of 277 168 workers in UK biobank

Wyse, C. A. et al. (2017) Adverse metabolic and mental health outcomes associated with shiftwork in a population-based study of 277 168 workers in UK biobank. Annals of Medicine, (doi:10.1080/07853890.2017.1292045) (PMID:28166415) (Early Online Publication)

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Abstract

Background: Reported associations between shiftwork and health have largely been based on occupation-specific, or single sex studies that might not be generalizable to the entire working population. The objective of this study was to investigate whether shiftwork was independently associated with obesity, diabetes, poor sleep, and well-being in a large, UK general population cohort. Methods: Participants of the UK Biobank study who were employed at the time of assessment were included. Exposure variables were self-reported shiftwork (any shiftwork and night shiftwork); and outcomes were objectively measured obesity, inflammation and physical activity and self-reported lifestyle, sleep and well-being variables, including mental health. Results: Shiftwork was reported by 17% of the 277,168 employed participants. Shiftworkers were more likely to be male, socioeconomically deprived and smokers, and to have higher levels of physical activity. Univariately, and following adjustment for lifestyle and work-related confounders, shiftworkers were more likely to be obese, depressed, to report disturbed sleep, and to have neurotic traits. Conclusions: Shiftwork was independently associated with multiple indicators of poor health and wellbeing, despite higher physical activity, and even in shiftworkers that did not work nights. Shiftwork is an emerging social factor that contributes to disease in the urban environment across the working population.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:CW was supported by a Lord Kelvin Adam Smith Fellowship from the University of Glasgow.
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Gill, Dr Jason and Smith, Professor Daniel and Mackay, Dr Daniel and Biello, Professor Stephany and Bailey, Dr Mark and Ward, Mr Joey and Celis, Dr Carlos and Wyse, Dr Cathy and Pell, Professor Jill
Authors: Wyse, C. A., Celis Morales, C. A., Graham, N., Fan, Y., Ward, J., Curtis, A. M., Mackay, D., Smith, D. J., Bailey, M. E.S., Biello, S., Gill, J. M.R., and Pell, J. P.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Life Sciences
Journal Name:Annals of Medicine
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:0785-3890
ISSN (Online):1365-2060
Published Online:06 February 2017
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor and Francis Group
First Published:First published in Annals of Medicine 2017
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

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