Acceptance and commitment therapy delivered in a dyad after a severe traumatic brain injury: a feasibility study

Whiting, D. L., Deane, F. P., Simpson, G. K., Ciarrochi, J. V. and McLeod, H. J. (2018) Acceptance and commitment therapy delivered in a dyad after a severe traumatic brain injury: a feasibility study. Clinical Psychologist, 22(2), pp. 230-240. (doi:10.1111/cp.12118)

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Abstract

Objective: There is a high prevalence of complex psychological distress after a traumatic brain injury but limited evidence of effective interventions. We examined the feasibility of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy after a severe traumatic brain injury using the criteria, investigating a therapeutic effect, and reviewing the acceptability of measures, treatment protocol, and delivery method (in a dyad of two clients and a therapist). Method: Two male outpatients with severe traumatic brain injury and associated psychological distress jointly engaged in a seven session treatment program based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy principles. Pre- and post-treatment measures of mood, psychological flexibility, and participation were taken in addition to weekly measures. Results: The intervention showed a therapeutic effect with one participant, and appeared to be acceptable for both participants with regard to program content, measures, and delivery mode by in a dyad. One participant showed both significant clinical and reliable change across several outcome measures including measures of mood and psychological flexibility. The second participant did not show a reduction in psychological inflexibility, but did show a significant drop in negative affect. Significant changes pre- to post-treatment for measures of participation were not indicated. Qualitatively, both participants engaged in committed action set in accordance with their values. Conclusions: This study suggests that Acceptance and Commitment Therapy may be feasible to be delivered in a dyad with individuals who have a severe traumatic brain injury. A further test of its potential efficacy in a phase II clinical trial is recommended.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:McLeod, Professor Hamish
Authors: Whiting, D. L., Deane, F. P., Simpson, G. K., Ciarrochi, J. V., and McLeod, H. J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
Journal Name:Clinical Psychologist
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:1328-4207
ISSN (Online):1742-9552
Published Online:07 March 2017
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 The Australian Psychological Society
First Published:First published in Clinical Psychologist 22(2): 230-240
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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