Role of exogenous inositol and phosphatidylinositol in glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor synthesis of GP49 by Giardia lamblia

Subramanian, A. B., Navarro, S., Carrasco, R. A., Marti, M. and Das, S. (2000) Role of exogenous inositol and phosphatidylinositol in glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor synthesis of GP49 by Giardia lamblia. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta: Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids, 1483(1), pp. 69-80. (doi:10.1016/S1388-1981(99)00171-7) (PMID:10601696)

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Abstract

Although Giardia lamblia trophozoites are unable to carry out de novo phospholipid synthesis, they can assemble complex glycophospholipids from simple lipids and fatty acids acquired from the host. Previously, we have reported that G. lamblia synthesizes GP49, an invariant surface antigen with a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. It is therefore possible that myo-inositol (Ins), phosphatidylinositol (PI) and other GPI precursors are obtained from the dietary products of the human small intestine, where the trophozoites colonize. In this report, we have investigated the role of exogenous Ins and PI on GPI anchor synthesis by G. lamblia. The results demonstrate that [3H]Ins and PI internalized by trophozoites, metabolically transformed into GlcN(acyl)-PI and downstream GPI molecules. Further investigations suggest that G. lamblia expresses cytidine monophosphate (CMP)-dependent (Mg2+-stimulated) and independent (Mn2+-stimulated) inositol headgroup exchange enzymes, which are responsible for exchanging free Ins with cellular PI. We observed that 3-deoxy-3-fluoro-D-myo-inositol (3-F-Ins) and 1-deoxy-1-F-scyllo-Ins (1-F-scyllo-Ins), which are considered potent inhibitors of Mn2+-stimulated headgroup exchange enzyme, inhibited the incorporation of [3H]Ins into PI and GPI molecules significantly, suggesting that CMP-independent (Mn2+-stimulated) exchange enzyme may be important for these reactions. However, 3-F-Ins and 1-F-scyllo-Ins were not effective in blocking the incorporation of exogenously supplied [3H]PI into GPI glycolipids. Thus, it can be concluded that G. lamblia can use exogenously supplied [3H]PI and [3H]Ins to synthesize GPI glycolipids of GP49; while PI is directly incorporated into GPI molecules, free Ins is first converted into PI by headgroup exchange enzymes, and this newly formed PI participates in GPI anchor synthesis.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Marti, Professor Matthias
Authors: Subramanian, A. B., Navarro, S., Carrasco, R. A., Marti, M., and Das, S.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
Journal Name:Biochimica et Biophysica Acta: Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1388-1981
ISSN (Online):1879-2618
Published Online:14 December 1999

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