'The effect of different genres of music on the stress levels of kennelled dogs'

Bowman, A., Scottish SPCA, , Dowell, F.J. and Evans, N.P. (2017) 'The effect of different genres of music on the stress levels of kennelled dogs'. Physiology and Behavior, 171, pp. 207-215. (doi:10.1016/j.physbeh.2017.01.024) (PMID:28093218)

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Abstract

Classical music has been shown to reduce stress in kennelled dogs; however, rapid habituation of dogs to this form of auditory enrichment has also been demonstrated. The current study investigated the physiological and behavioural response of kennelled dogs (n = 38) to medium-term (5 days) auditory enrichment with five different genres of music including Soft Rock, Motown, Pop, Reggae and Classical, to determine whether increasing the variety of auditory stimulation reduces the level of habituation to auditory enrichment. Dogs were found to spend significantly more time lying and significantly less time standing when music was played, regardless of genre. There was no observable effect of music on barking, however, dogs were significantly (z = 2.2, P < 0.05) more likely to bark following cessation of auditory enrichment. Heart Rate Variability (HRV) was significantly higher, indicative of decreased stress, when dogs were played Soft Rock and Reggae, with a lesser effect observed when Motown, Pop and Classical genres were played. Relative to the silent period prior to auditory enrichment, urinary cortisol:creatanine (UCCR) values were significantly higher during Soft Rock (t = 2.781, P < 0.01) and the second silent control period following auditory enrichment (t = 2.46, P < 0.05). Despite the mixed response to different genres, the physiological and behavioural changes observed remained constant over the 5d of enrichment suggesting that the effect of habituation may be reduced by increasing the variety of auditory enrichment provided.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:The authors would like to thank the Scottish SPCA [1-69559] for funding this research.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Dowell, Dr Fiona and Bowman, Amy and Evans, Professor Neil
Authors: Bowman, A., Scottish SPCA, , Dowell, F.J., and Evans, N.P.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine
Journal Name:Physiology and Behavior
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0031-9384
ISSN (Online):1873-507X
Published Online:14 January 2017
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc.
First Published:First published in Physiology and Behavior 171: 207-215
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

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