UK Newsprint Coverage of the Debate about Further Protective Smoke-Free Laws to Reduce Second-Hand Smoke Exposure to Children in Cars

Hilton, S. , Bain, J., Duffy, S. and Semple, S. (2014) UK Newsprint Coverage of the Debate about Further Protective Smoke-Free Laws to Reduce Second-Hand Smoke Exposure to Children in Cars. 13th Annual Advances in Qualitative Methods (AQM) Conference, Alberta, Canada, 23-25 June 2014. pp. 473-474.

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Publisher's URL: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/160940691401300127

Abstract

Since 2007 there has been legislation prohibiting smoking in all enclosed public places throughout the UK. In the intervening period interest has grown in considering other policy interventions to further reduce the harmful effects of second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure to children. This study offers the first UK investigation into how the news media are framing the current debate around the harms of SHS exposure to children in cars and what role they may be playing in presenting ideas about the need for further smoke-free laws to protect children. Methods: Qualitative content analysis was conducted on six UK and three Scottish national newspapers between 1st Jan 2004 to 31st Dec 2013. Findings: Exposure to SHS was increasingly identified as being harmful to the health of children, with cars being described as one of the main places of exposure for children following the smoke-free laws. Legislative action was deemed necessary, as well as enforceable, and growing public support highlighted a change in public attitudes towards smoking and willingness for further legislation on SHS to protect children. There were a wide range of advocates in comparison to a narrow number of critics. Conclusions: Over a decade there was increased reporting on the harms of SHS exposure to children while traveling in cars. This may indicate that there is growing public and policy appetite for further smoke-free legislation to protect children. Previous private vehicle laws suggest that further smoke-free legislation could be successful. Advocates would do well to consider whether there are current opportunities for playing a greater role in the wider debate surrounding the harms of SHS exposure to children in cars.

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item
Additional Information:Abstract published in International Journal of Qualitative Methods v. 13
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Bain, Mr Josh and Hilton, Professor Shona
Authors: Hilton, S., Bain, J., Duffy, S., and Semple, S.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO SPHSU
ISSN:1609-4069

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