Human olfactory mesenchymal stromal cell transplants promote remyelination and earlier improvement in gait co-ordination after spinal cord injury

Lindsay, S. L., Toft, A., Griffin, J., Emraja, A. M.M., Barnett, S. C. and Riddell, J. (2017) Human olfactory mesenchymal stromal cell transplants promote remyelination and earlier improvement in gait co-ordination after spinal cord injury. Glia, 65(4), pp. 639-656. (doi:10.1002/glia.23117) (PMID:28144983) (PMCID:PMC5324664)

Lindsay, S. L., Toft, A., Griffin, J., Emraja, A. M.M., Barnett, S. C. and Riddell, J. (2017) Human olfactory mesenchymal stromal cell transplants promote remyelination and earlier improvement in gait co-ordination after spinal cord injury. Glia, 65(4), pp. 639-656. (doi:10.1002/glia.23117) (PMID:28144983) (PMCID:PMC5324664)

[img]
Preview
Text
133942.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

2MB

Abstract

Autologous cell transplantation is a promising strategy for repair of the injured spinal cord. Here we have studied the repair potential of mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from the human olfactory mucosa after transplantation into a rodent model of incomplete spinal cord injury. Investigation of peripheral type remyelination at the injury site using immunocytochemistry for P0, showed a more extensive distribution in transplanted compared with control animals. In addition to the typical distribution in the dorsal columns (common to all animals), in transplanted animals only, P0 immunolabelling was consistently detected in white matter lateral and ventral to the injury site. Transplanted animals also showed reduced cavitation. Several functional outcome measures including end-point electrophysiological testing of dorsal column conduction and weekly behavioural testing of BBB, weight bearing and pain, showed no difference between transplanted and control animals. However, gait analysis revealed an earlier recovery of co-ordination between forelimb and hindlimb stepping in transplanted animals. This improvement in gait may be associated with the enhanced myelination in ventral and lateral white matter, where fibre tracts important for locomotion reside. Autologous transplantation of mesenchymal stromal cells from the olfactory mucosa may therefore be therapeutically beneficial in the treatment of spinal cord injury.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Toft, Mr Andrew and Barnett, Professor Susan and Lindsay, Dr Susan and Riddell, Dr John
Authors: Lindsay, S. L., Toft, A., Griffin, J., Emraja, A. M.M., Barnett, S. C., and Riddell, J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology
Journal Name:Glia
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:0894-1491
ISSN (Online):1098-1136
Published Online:01 February 2017
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 The Authors
First Published:First published in Glia 65(4):639-656
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record

Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
584331Does cellular niche affect the repair potential of mesenchymal stem cells; implications for spinal cord injury?Susan BarnettMedical Research Council (MRC)MR/J004731/1III -IMMUNOLOGY