Combinational approaches to improve outcomes following peripheral nerve repair

Thomson, S. E., Déjardin, T., Tsimbouri, M. P. , Hart, A. M. and Riehle, M. O. (2014) Combinational approaches to improve outcomes following peripheral nerve repair. Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, 67(10), p. 1465. (doi:10.1016/j.bjps.2014.08.032)

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Abstract

Introduction and aims: Peripheral nerve injury is common (1/1000) and can be functionally devastating. Despite advances in microsurgical repair axonal regrowth across the repair site, and functional outcome, remain unsatisfactory. The neurobiology of the nerve repair must be unraveled. Work at the University of Glasgow Centre for Cell Engineering and collaborating laboratories has previously demonstrated that healing nerves respond to both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The directionality and rate of axonal regrowth following injury can be enhanced in vitro by growing cells on a nano/micropatterned surface. Exactly how these external factors exhibit their effect is unknown. This study aimed to demonstrate the downstream genetic effects of this extrinsic mechanical cue. Material and methods: Quantitative rt-PCR was used to demonstrate the downstream genetic effects of this extrinsic cue. Gene expression was measured at day 0, 1, 2, 5 and 10 following injury, of nerves grown on either the patterned surface or a smooth control. The Sprague-Dawley ex vivo model was used. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated axonal outgrowth. Results: Altering the topographical substrate on which nerves were grown resulted in a significant alteration in expression of the genes studied (MTOR, CRAT, MAP3K12), most pronounced at day 2 post injury (p < 0.05). Expression timelines and molecular pathways are discussed. Conclusion(s): This study further characterises a useful animal model and provides more detail on the complex interactions underlying nerve repair. It highlights some of the downstream effects of micropatterning, that could be harnessed and combined with other recent advances for the development of clincally useful nerve conduits.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Thomson, Miss Suzanne and Tsimbouri, Dr Monica and Riehle, Dr Mathis and Hart, Mr Andrew
Authors: Thomson, S. E., Déjardin, T., Tsimbouri, M. P., Hart, A. M., and Riehle, M. O.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Molecular Cell and Systems Biology
Journal Name:Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1748-6815
ISSN (Online):1878-0539
Published Online:16 September 2014

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