Association between grip strength and diabetes prevalence in black, South Asian, and white European ethnic groups: a cross-sectional study of 418,656 UK Biobank participants

Ntuk, U.E., Celis-Morales, C.A. , Mackay, D.F. , Sattar, N. , Pell, J.P. and Gill, J.M.R. (2017) Association between grip strength and diabetes prevalence in black, South Asian, and white European ethnic groups: a cross-sectional study of 418,656 UK Biobank participants. Diabetic Medicine, 34(8), pp. 1120-1128. (doi:10.1111/dme.13323) (PMID:28144980)

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Abstract

Aims: To quantify the extent to which ethnic differences in muscular strength might account for the substantially higher prevalence of diabetes in black and South-Asian compared with white European adults. Methods: This cross-sectional study used baseline data from the UK Biobank study on 418 656 white European, black and South-Asian participants, aged 40–69 years, who had complete data on diabetes status and hand-grip strength. Associations between hand-grip strength and diabetes were assessed using logistic regression and were adjusted for potential confounding factors. Results: Lower grip strength was associated with higher prevalence of diabetes, independent of confounding factors, across all ethnicities in both men and women. Diabetes prevalence was approximately three- to fourfold higher in South-Asian and two- to threefold higher in black participants compared with white European participants across all levels of grip strength, but grip strength in South-Asian men and women was ~5–6 kg lower than in the other ethnic groups. Thus, the attributable risk for diabetes associated with low grip strength was substantially higher in South-Asian participants (3.9 and 4.2 cases per 100 men and women, respectively) than in white participants (2.0 and 0.6 cases per 100 men and women, respectively). Attributable risk associated with low grip strength was also high in black men (4.3 cases) but not in black women (0.4 cases). Conclusions: Low strength is associated with a disproportionately large number of diabetes cases in South-Asian men and women and in black men. Trials are needed to determine whether interventions to improve strength in these groups could help reduce ethnic inequalities in diabetes prevalence.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This research has been conducted using the UK Biobank resource. UK Biobank was established by the Wellcome Trust medical charity, Medical Research Council, Department of Health, Scottish Government and the Northwest Regional Development Agency. It has also had funding from the Welsh Assembly Government and the British Heart Foundation. UEN was funded by the Niger Delta Development Commission, Nigeria. The research was designed, conducted, analysed, and interpreted by the authors entirely independently of the funding sources
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Celis, Dr Carlos and Gill, Professor Jason and Pell, Professor Jill and Mackay, Dr Daniel and Sattar, Professor Naveed
Authors: Ntuk, U.E., Celis-Morales, C.A., Mackay, D.F., Sattar, N., Pell, J.P., and Gill, J.M.R.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Public Health
Journal Name:Diabetic Medicine
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:0742-3071
ISSN (Online):1464-5491
Published Online:01 February 2017
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 Diabetes UK
First Published:First published in Diabetic Medicine 34(8): 1120-1128
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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