Hair nicotine concentration measurement in cats and its relationship to owner-reported environmental tobacco smoke exposure

Smith, V.A., McBrearty, A.R., Watson, D.G., Mellor, D.J. , Spence, S. and Knottenbelt, C. (2017) Hair nicotine concentration measurement in cats and its relationship to owner-reported environmental tobacco smoke exposure. Journal of Small Animal Practice, 58(1), pp. 3-9. (doi:10.1111/jsap.12616) (PMID:28094859)

Smith, V.A., McBrearty, A.R., Watson, D.G., Mellor, D.J. , Spence, S. and Knottenbelt, C. (2017) Hair nicotine concentration measurement in cats and its relationship to owner-reported environmental tobacco smoke exposure. Journal of Small Animal Practice, 58(1), pp. 3-9. (doi:10.1111/jsap.12616) (PMID:28094859)

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Abstract

Objectives: To investigate the association between hair nicotine concentration in cats and owner-reported exposure to environmental tobacco smoke. Materials and Methods: Owner questionnaires documented exposure. Nicotine was extracted from hair by sonification in methanol followed by hydrophilic interaction chromatography with mass spectrometry. Relationships between hair nicotine concentration and owner-reported exposure were examined using hypothesis-testing statistics and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Results: The hair nicotine concentration of reportedly exposed cats was significantly higher than unexposed cats and groups of cats with different levels of exposure had significantly different median hair nicotine concentrations corresponding to exposure. A hair nicotine concentration of 0·1 ng/mg had a specificity of 98% (95% confidence interval: 83 to 100) and a sensitivity of 69% (95% confidence interval: 54 to 84) for detecting environmental tobacco smoke exposure. Outdoors access, coat colour, urban or rural environment and length of time living with the owner were not obviously associated with hair nicotine concentration. Clinical Significance: Feline hair nicotine concentration appears strongly associated with owner-reported environmental tobacco smoke exposure. Feline hair nicotine concentration could therefore be used as a biomarker for tobacco smoke exposure, allowing future studies to assess whether exposed cats have an increased risk of specific diseases.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Knottenbelt, Professor Clare and McBrearty, Mrs Alix and Spence, Mrs Susan and Mellor, Professor Dominic
Authors: Smith, V.A., McBrearty, A.R., Watson, D.G., Mellor, D.J., Spence, S., and Knottenbelt, C.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine
Journal Name:Journal of Small Animal Practice
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:0022-4510
ISSN (Online):1748-5827
Published Online:17 January 2017

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