Risk factors for leptospirosis seropositivity in slaughterhouse workers in western Kenya

Cook, E. A. J., de Glanville, W. A., Thomas, L. F., Kariuki, S., Bronsvoort, B. M. d. C. and Fèvre, E. M. (2017) Risk factors for leptospirosis seropositivity in slaughterhouse workers in western Kenya. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 74(5), pp. 357-365. (doi: 10.1136/oemed-2016-103895) (PMID:27913579)

[img]
Preview
Text
132305.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

1MB

Abstract

Objectives: Leptospirosis has been documented in slaughterhouse workers around the world. Risk factors include smoking and drinking at work, and performing tasks such as cleaning offal. This paper examined risk factors for leptospirosis seropositivity in slaughterhouse workers in western Kenya. Methods: The study was conducted between May 2011 and October 2012. Questionnaires were used to collect information from workers on demographic data, health and hygiene practices in the slaughterhouse. A commercial ELISA detected antibodies to Leptospira spp. in serum samples and multilevel logistic regression analysis identified factors associated with leptospirosis seropositivity. Results: A total of 737 workers from 142 slaughterhouses were recruited. The seroprevalence of antibodies to Leptospira spp. was 13.4% (95% CI 11.1% to 16.1%). Risk factors included: having wounds (OR 3.1; 95% CI 1.5 to 6.1); smoking (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.1 to 2.9); eating at work (OR 2.1; 95% CI 1.2 to 3.6); cleaning the offal (OR 5.1; 95% CI 1.8 to 15.0); and having a borehole for personal water use (OR 2.3; 95% CI 1.1 to 4.7). At the slaughterhouse level, risk factors included having a roof (OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.2 to 5.6) and drawing water from a well (OR 2.2; 95% CI 1.2 to 4.0). Protective factors included working in slaughterhouses where antemortem inspection was conducted (OR 0.6; 95% CI 0.4 to 1.0) and where workers wore protective aprons (OR 0.4; 95% CI 0.2 to 0.7). Conclusions: This is the first report of leptospirosis seropositivity in slaughterhouse workers in Kenya. Potential risk factors were identified and this information can be used to educate workers regarding their disease risks and ways to prevent or reduce transmission.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:Funding: The Medical Research Council (MRC) and an Innovation Initiative Grant (GR000154) from the University of Edinburgh supported EAJC. The Biotechnology and Biological Research Council (BBSRC) supported LFT and WAdG. BMdeCB received core strategic funding from the BBSRC. The Wellcome Trust (085308) supported EMF and the People, Animals and their Zoonoses (‘PAZ’). Support was also received from the CGIAR Research Programme on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health (A4NH), led by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). The authors acknowledge the CGIAR Fund Donors (http://www.cgiar.org/who-we-are/ cgiar-fund/fund-donors-2). The Busia laboratory is currently supported by the BBSRC, the Department for International Development (DFID), the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), the MRC, the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL), under the Zoonoses and Emerging Livestock Systems (ZELS) programme, grant reference BB/ L019019/1.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:De Glanville, Dr William
Authors: Cook, E. A. J., de Glanville, W. A., Thomas, L. F., Kariuki, S., Bronsvoort, B. M. d. C., and Fèvre, E. M.
Subjects:R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
Journal Name:Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:1351-0711
ISSN (Online):1470-7926
Published Online:02 December 2016
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2016 The Authors
First Published:First published in Occupational and Environmental Medicine 74(5):357-365
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record