Exposure to tobacco smoke in utero or during early childhood and risk of hypomania: prospective birth cohort study

Mackay, D.F. , Anderson, J.J. , Pell, J.P. , Zammit, S. and Smith, D.J. (2017) Exposure to tobacco smoke in utero or during early childhood and risk of hypomania: prospective birth cohort study. European Psychiatry, 39, pp. 33-39. (doi:10.1016/j.eurpsy.2016.06.001) (PMID:27810616)

Mackay, D.F. , Anderson, J.J. , Pell, J.P. , Zammit, S. and Smith, D.J. (2017) Exposure to tobacco smoke in utero or during early childhood and risk of hypomania: prospective birth cohort study. European Psychiatry, 39, pp. 33-39. (doi:10.1016/j.eurpsy.2016.06.001) (PMID:27810616)

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Abstract

Objectives: Using data from a prospective birth cohort, we aimed to test for an association between exposure to tobacco smoke in utero or during early development and the experience of hypomania assessed in young adulthood. Methods: We used data on 2957 participants from a large birth cohort (Avon longitudinal study of parents and children [ALSPAC]). The primary outcome of interest was hypomania, and the secondary outcome was “hypomania plus previous psychotic experiences (PE)”. Maternally-reported smoking during pregnancy, paternal smoking and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in childhood were the exposures of interest. Multivariable logistic regression was used and estimates of association were adjusted for socio-economic, lifestyle and obstetric factors. Results: There was weak evidence of an association between exposure to maternal smoking in utero and lifetime hypomania. However, there was a strong association of maternal smoking during pregnancy within the sub-group of individuals with hypomania who had also experienced psychotic symptoms (OR = 3.45; 95% CI: 1.49–7.98; P = 0.004). There was no association between paternal smoking, or exposure to ETS during childhood, and hypomania outcomes. Conclusions: Exposure to smoking in utero may be a risk factor for more severe forms of psychopathology on the mood-psychosis spectrum, rather than DSM-defined bipolar disorder.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This specific analysis was funded by a strategic start-up grant from the university of Glasgow to DJS. DJS is supported by a Lister institute prize fellowship.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Smith, Professor Daniel and Anderson, Dr Jana and Pell, Professor Jill and Mackay, Dr Daniel
Authors: Mackay, D.F., Anderson, J.J., Pell, J.P., Zammit, S., and Smith, D.J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Public Health
Journal Name:European Psychiatry
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0924-9338
ISSN (Online):1778-3585
Published Online:01 November 2016
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS
First Published:First published in European Psychiatry 39: 33-39
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

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