Are physiological and behavioral immune responses negatively correlated? Evidence from hormone-linked differences in men's face preferences

Kandrik, M. , Hahn, A. C. , Fisher, C. I., Wincenciak, J. , Debruine, L. M. and Jones, B. C. (2017) Are physiological and behavioral immune responses negatively correlated? Evidence from hormone-linked differences in men's face preferences. Hormones and Behavior, 87, pp. 57-61. (doi:10.1016/j.yhbeh.2016.10.021) (PMID:27810343)

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Abstract

Behaviors that minimize exposure to sources of pathogens can carry opportunity costs. Consequently, how individuals resolve the tradeoff between the benefits and costs of behavioral immune responses should be sensitive to the extent to which they are vulnerable to infectious diseases. However, although it is a strong prediction of this functional flexibility principle, there is little compelling evidence that individuals with stronger physiological immune responses show weaker behavioral immune responses. Here we show that men with the combination of high testosterone and low cortisol levels, a hormonal profile recently found to be associated with particularly strong physiological immune responses, show weaker preferences for color cues associated with carotenoid pigmentation. Since carotenoid cues are thought to index vulnerability to infectious illnesses, our results are consistent with the functional flexibility principle's prediction that individuals with stronger physiological immune responses show weaker behavioral immune responses.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Hahn, Dr Amanda and Wincenciak, Dr Joanna and Debruine, Professor Lisa and Kandrik, Dr Michal and Jones, Professor Benedict and Fisher, Dr Claire
Authors: Kandrik, M., Hahn, A. C., Fisher, C. I., Wincenciak, J., Debruine, L. M., and Jones, B. C.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology
Journal Name:Hormones and Behavior
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0018-506X
ISSN (Online):1095-6867
Published Online:31 October 2016
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2016 The Authors
First Published:First published in Hormones and Behavior 87:57-61
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
604381OCMATE�\200\224 Do oral contraceptives alter women�\200\231s mate preferences?Benedict JonesEuropean Research Council (ERC)OCMATE FP7ERC28RI NEUROSCIENCE & PSYCHOLOGY
591541ESRC Doctoral Training Centre 2011...Mary Beth KneafseyEconomic & Social Research Council (ESRC)ES/J500136/1VPO VICE PRINCIPAL RESEARCH & ENTERPRISE