Chronic photoperiod disruption does not increase vulnerability to focal cerebral ischemia in young normotensive rats

Noor, K. M. K. M., Wyse, C., Roy, L. A., Biello, S. M., McCabe, C. and Dewar, D. (2017) Chronic photoperiod disruption does not increase vulnerability to focal cerebral ischemia in young normotensive rats. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 37(11), pp. 3580-3588. (doi:10.1177/0271678X16671316) (PMID:27789784) (PMCID:PMC5669340)

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Abstract

Photoperiod disruption, which occurs during shift work, is associated with changes in metabolism or physiology (e.g. hypertension and hyperglycaemia) that have the potential to adversely affect stroke outcome. We sought to investigate if photoperiod disruption affects vulnerability to stroke by determining the impact of photoperiod disruption on infarct size following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Adult male Wistar rats (210–290 g) were housed singly under two different light/dark cycle conditions (n = 12 each). Controls were maintained on a standard 12:12 light/dark cycle for nine weeks. For rats exposed to photoperiod disruption, every three days for nine weeks, the lights were switched on 6 h earlier than in the previous photoperiod. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was performed at 48 h after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Disruption of photoperiod in young healthy rats for nine weeks did not alter key physiological variables that can impact on ischaemic damage, e.g. blood pressure and blood glucose immediately prior to middle cerebral artery occlusion. There was no effect of photoperiod disruption on infarct size after middle cerebral artery occlusion. We conclude that any potentially adverse effect of photoperiod disruption on stroke outcome may require additional factors such as high fat/high sugar diet or pre-existing co-morbidities.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Biello, Professor Stephany and Dewar, Dr Deborah and Wyse, Dr Cathy and McCabe, Dr Chris and Thow, Dr Lisa
Authors: Noor, K. M. K. M., Wyse, C., Roy, L. A., Biello, S. M., McCabe, C., and Dewar, D.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology
Journal Name:Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
Publisher:SAGE Publications
ISSN:0271-678X
ISSN (Online):1559-7016
Published Online:10 October 2016
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2016 The Authors
First Published:First published in Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism 37(11): 3580-3588
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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