“There goes the fear”: Feelings of safety at home and in the neighbourhood: the role of personal, social and service factors

Allik, M. and Kearns, A. (2017) “There goes the fear”: Feelings of safety at home and in the neighbourhood: the role of personal, social and service factors. Journal of Community Psychology, 45(4), pp. 543-563. (doi:10.1002/jcop.21875)

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Abstract

Safety has been shown to be an important contributor to mental wellbeing and is often identified as a key element of sustainable communities. Drawing on the fear of crime literature this paper investigates the determinants of feelings of indoor and outdoor safety for people living in deprived areas, using both cross-sectional and longitudinal samples from household surveys in 15 communities in Glasgow. Across the different models social cohesion, satisfaction with services and perceived empowerment emerge as the most robust predictors of feeling very safe indoors and outside. Our findings suggest useful extensions to several theoretical models of the fear of crime: the vulnerability hypothesis should include social vulnerability more generally; environmental models should focus on local amenities and services as well as on disorder; and social-psychological models should consider not only informal social control but resident empowerment in relation to housing and neighbourhood issues.

Item Type:Articles
Keywords:Safety, fear of crime, home, neighbourhood, deprived areas, Glasgow.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Allik, Dr Mirjam and Kearns, Professor Ade
Authors: Allik, M., and Kearns, A.
College/School:College of Social Sciences > School of Social and Political Sciences > Urban Studies
Journal Name:Journal of Community Psychology
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:0090-4392
ISSN (Online):1520-6629
Published Online:30 November 2016
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
First Published:First published in Journal of Community Psychology 45(4): 543-563
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

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