The importance of socio-economic versus environmental risk factors for reported dengue cases in Java, Indonesia

Wijayanti, S. P. M., Porphyre, T., Chase-Topping, M., Rainey, S. M., McFarlane, M. , Schnettler, E., Biek, R. and Kohl, A. (2016) The importance of socio-economic versus environmental risk factors for reported dengue cases in Java, Indonesia. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 10(9), e0004964. (doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0004964) (PMID:27603137) (PMCID:PMC5014450)

Wijayanti, S. P. M., Porphyre, T., Chase-Topping, M., Rainey, S. M., McFarlane, M. , Schnettler, E., Biek, R. and Kohl, A. (2016) The importance of socio-economic versus environmental risk factors for reported dengue cases in Java, Indonesia. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 10(9), e0004964. (doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0004964) (PMID:27603137) (PMCID:PMC5014450)

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Abstract

Background: Dengue is a major mosquito-borne viral disease and an important public health problem. Identifying which factors are important determinants in the risk of dengue infection is critical in supporting and guiding preventive measures. In South-East Asia, half of all reported fatal infections are recorded in Indonesia, yet little is known about the epidemiology of dengue in this country. Methodology/Principal findings: Hospital-reported dengue cases in Banyumas regency, Central Java were examined to build Bayesian spatial and spatio-temporal models assessing the influence of climatic, demographic and socio-economic factors on the risk of dengue infection. A socio-economic factor linking employment type and economic status was the most influential on the risk of dengue infection in the Regency. Other factors such as access to healthcare facilities and night-time temperature were also found to be associated with higher risk of reported dengue infection but had limited explanatory power. Conclusions/Significance: Our data suggest that dengue infections are triggered by indoor transmission events linked to socio-economic factors (employment type, economic status). Preventive measures in this area should therefore target also specific environments such as schools and work areas to attempt and reduce dengue burden in this community. Although our analysis did not account for factors such as variations in immunity which need further investigation, this study can advise preventive measures in areas with similar patterns of reported dengue cases and environment

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Schnettler, Dr Esther and Rainey, Dr Stephanie and Wijayanti, Miss Siwi and Biek, Dr Roman and Mcdonald, Dr Melanie and Kohl, Professor Alain
Authors: Wijayanti, S. P. M., Porphyre, T., Chase-Topping, M., Rainey, S. M., McFarlane, M., Schnettler, E., Biek, R., and Kohl, A.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
Journal Name:PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Publisher:Public Library of Science
ISSN:1935-2727
ISSN (Online):1935-2735
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2016 Wijayanti et al.
First Published:First published in PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 10(9):e0004964
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
656501Regulation of the initial stages of herpes simplex virus lytic infection and reactivation from latencyRoger EverettMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_12014/4MVLS III - CENTRE FOR VIRUS RESEARCH