Stomatal spacing safeguards stomatal dynamics by facilitating guard cell ion transport independent of the epidermal solute reservoir

Papanatsiou, M., Amtmann, A. and Blatt, M. R. (2016) Stomatal spacing safeguards stomatal dynamics by facilitating guard cell ion transport independent of the epidermal solute reservoir. Plant Physiology, 172(1), pp. 254-263. (doi:10.1104/pp.16.00850) (PMID:27406168)

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Abstract

Stomata enable gaseous exchange between the interior of the leaf and the atmosphere through the stomatal pore. Control of the pore aperture depends on osmotic solute accumulation by, and its loss from the guard cells surrounding the pore. Stomata in most plants are separated by at least one epidermal cell, and this spacing is thought to enhance stomatal function, although there are several genera that exhibit stomata in clusters. We made use of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) stomatal patterning mutants to explore the impact of clustering on guard cell dynamics, gas exchange, and ion transport of guard cells. These studies showed that stomatal clustering in the Arabidopsis too many mouths (tmm1) mutant suppressed stomatal movements and affected CO2 assimilation and transpiration differentially between dark and light conditions and were associated with alterations in K+ channel gating. These changes were consistent with the impaired dynamics of tmm1 stomata and were accompanied by a reduced accumulation of K+ ions in the guard cells. Our findings underline the significance of spacing for stomatal dynamics. While stomatal spacing may be important as a reservoir for K+ and other ions to facilitate stomatal movements, the effects on channel gating, and by inference on K+ accumulation, cannot be explained on the basis of a reduced number of epidermal cells facilitating ion supply to the guard cells.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Blatt, Professor Michael and Amtmann, Professor Anna and Papanatsiou, Miss Maria
Authors: Papanatsiou, M., Amtmann, A., and Blatt, M. R.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Molecular Cell and Systems Biology
Journal Name:Plant Physiology
Publisher:American Society of Plant Biologists
ISSN:0032-0889
Published Online:11 July 2016
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2016 The Authors
First Published:First published in Plant Physiology 172(1): 254-263
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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