Off-line learning of motor skill memory: A double dissociation of goal and movement

Cohen, D. A., Pascual-Leone, A., Press, D. Z. and Robertson, E.M. (2005) Off-line learning of motor skill memory: A double dissociation of goal and movement. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 102(50), pp. 18237-18241. (doi:10.1073/pnas.0506072102) (PMID:16330773) (PMCID:PMC1312380)

Full text not currently available from Enlighten.

Abstract

Acquiring a new skill requires learning multiple aspects of a task simultaneously. For example, learning a piano sonata requires learning the musical notes and being able to implement this goal by learning the appropriate sequence of finger movements. After practice, skill continues to develop off-line during a period of consolidation. Here we show that different aspects of a procedural memory are processed separately during consolidation: Only the movement sequence is enhanced over the day; whereas only the goal is enhanced over a night of sleep. This double dissociation suggests that distinct systems, enhancing different aspects of a procedural memory, support improvements during consolidation. Consolidation is not a single process; instead, there are multiple routes to off-line learning, and the engagement of these distinct mechanisms is determined by when consolidation takes place.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Robertson, Professor Edwin
Authors: Cohen, D. A., Pascual-Leone, A., Press, D. Z., and Robertson, E.M.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology
Journal Name:Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Publisher:National Academy of Sciences
ISSN:0027-8424
ISSN (Online):1091-6490
Published Online:13 December 2005

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record