Daytime sleep enhances consolidation of the spatial but not motoric representation of motor sequence memory

Albouy, G., Fogel, S., Pottiez, H., Nguyen, V. A., Ray, L., Lungu, O., Carrier, J., Robertson, E. and Doyon, J. (2013) Daytime sleep enhances consolidation of the spatial but not motoric representation of motor sequence memory. PLoS ONE, 8(1), e52805. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0052805) (PMID:23300993) (PMCID:PMC3534707)

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Abstract

Motor sequence learning is known to rely on more than a single process. As the skill develops with practice, two different representations of the sequence are formed: a goal representation built under spatial allocentric coordinates and a movement representation mediated through egocentric motor coordinates. This study aimed to explore the influence of daytime sleep (nap) on consolidation of these two representations. Through the manipulation of an explicit finger sequence learning task and a transfer protocol, we show that both allocentric (spatial) and egocentric (motor) representations of the sequence can be isolated after initial training. Our results also demonstrate that nap favors the emergence of offline gains in performance for the allocentric, but not the egocentric representation, even after accounting for fatigue effects. Furthermore, sleep-dependent gains in performance observed for the allocentric representation are correlated with spindle density during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep of the post-training nap. In contrast, performance on the egocentric representation is only maintained, but not improved, regardless of the sleep/wake condition. These results suggest that motor sequence memory acquisition and consolidation involve distinct mechanisms that rely on sleep (and specifically, spindle) or simple passage of time, depending respectively on whether the sequence is performed under allocentric or egocentric coordinates.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This study was supported by the Canadian Institutes of Health and Research (CIHR) as well as the Ministry of Economic Development, Innovation and Exportation of Quebec (MDEIE). GA was first supported by a postdoctoral grant from the Fyssen Foundation and is now supported through a CIHR postdoctoral grant.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Robertson, Professor Edwin
Authors: Albouy, G., Fogel, S., Pottiez, H., Nguyen, V. A., Ray, L., Lungu, O., Carrier, J., Robertson, E., and Doyon, J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology
Journal Name:PLoS ONE
Publisher:Public Library of Science
ISSN:1932-6203
ISSN (Online):1932-6203
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2013 Albouy et al.
First Published:First published in PLoS ONE 8(1):e52805
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons license

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