Resting state connectivity immediately following learning correlates with subsequent sleep-dependent enhancement of motor task performance

Gregory, M. D., Agam, Y., Selvadurai, C., Nagy, A., Vangel, M., Tucker, M., Robertson, E. M. , Stickgold, R. and Manoach, D. S. (2014) Resting state connectivity immediately following learning correlates with subsequent sleep-dependent enhancement of motor task performance. NeuroImage, 102, pp. 666-673. (doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.08.044) (PMID:25173415) (PMCID:PMC4252600)

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Abstract

There is ongoing debate concerning the functions of resting-state brain activity. Prior work demonstrates that memory encoding enhances subsequent resting-state functional connectivity within task-relevant networks and that these changes predict better recognition. Here, we used functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) to examine whether task-induced changes in resting-state connectivity correlate with performance improvement after sleep. In two separate sessions, resting-state scans were acquired before and after participants performed a motor task. In one session participants trained on the motor sequence task (MST), a well-established probe of sleep-dependent memory consolidation, and were tested the next day, after a night of sleep. In the other session they performed a motor control task (MCT) that minimized learning. In an accompanying behavioral control study, participants trained on the MST and were tested after either a night of sleep or an equivalent interval of daytime wake. Both the fcMRI and the sleep control groups showed significant improvement of MST performance, while the wake control group did not. In the fcMRI group, increased connectivity in bilateral motor cortex following MST training correlated with this next-day improvement. This increased connectivity did not appear to reflect initial learning since it did not correlate with learning during training and was not greater after MST training than MCT performance. Instead, we hypothesize that this increased connectivity processed the new memories for sleep-dependent consolidation. Our findings demonstrate that physiological processes immediately after learning correlate with sleep-dependent performance improvement and suggest that the wakeful resting brain prepares memories of recent experiences for later consolidation during sleep.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Robertson, Professor Edwin
Authors: Gregory, M. D., Agam, Y., Selvadurai, C., Nagy, A., Vangel, M., Tucker, M., Robertson, E. M., Stickgold, R., and Manoach, D. S.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology
Journal Name:NeuroImage
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1053-8119
ISSN (Online):1095-9572
Published Online:28 August 2014

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