Maintaining vs. enhancing motor sequence memories: Respective roles of striatal and hippocampal systems

Albouy, G., Fogel, S., King, B. R., Laventure, S., Benali, H., Karni, A., Carrier, J., Robertson, E. M. and Doyon, J. (2015) Maintaining vs. enhancing motor sequence memories: Respective roles of striatal and hippocampal systems. NeuroImage, 108, pp. 423-434. (doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.12.049) (PMID:25542533)

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Abstract

It is now accepted that hippocampal- and striatal-dependent memory systems do not act independently, but rather interact during both memory acquisition and consolidation. However, the respective functional roles of the hippocampus and the striatum in these processes remain unknown. Here, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used in a daytime sleep/wake protocol to investigate this knowledge gap. Using a protocol developed earlier in our lab (Albouy et al., 2013a), the manipulation of an explicit sequential finger-tapping task, allowed us to isolate allocentric (spatial) and egocentric (motor) representations of the sequence, which were supported by distinct hippocampo- and striato-cortical networks, respectively. Importantly, a sleep-dependent performance enhancement emerged for the hippocampal-dependent memory trace, whereas performance was maintained for the striatal-dependent memory trace, irrespective of the sleep condition. Regression analyses indicated that the interaction between these two systems influenced subsequent performance improvements. While striatal activity was negatively correlated with performance enhancement after both sleep and wakefulness in the allocentric representation, hippocampal activity was positively related to performance improvement for the egocentric representation, but only if sleep was allowed after training. Our results provide the first direct evidence of a functional dissociation in consolidation processes whereby memory stabilization seems supported by the striatum in a time-dependent manner whereas memory enhancement seems linked to hippocampal activity and sleep-dependent processes.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Robertson, Professor Edwin
Authors: Albouy, G., Fogel, S., King, B. R., Laventure, S., Benali, H., Karni, A., Carrier, J., Robertson, E. M., and Doyon, J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology
Journal Name:NeuroImage
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1053-8119
ISSN (Online):1095-9572
Published Online:23 December 2014

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