Can a Sports Team-based Lifestyle Program (Hockey Fans In Training) Improve Weight In Overweight Men?

Petrel, R. J. et al. (2015) Can a Sports Team-based Lifestyle Program (Hockey Fans In Training) Improve Weight In Overweight Men? In: American College of Sports Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, 1-4 June 2015,

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Abstract

The issue of gender is often neglected when planning and implementing chronic disease prevention and management strategies. Football Fans in Training (FFIT) — a gender-sensitized, weight loss and healthy living program for men delivered via professional football clubs — has been shown to be highly effective in helping overweight/obese men lose weight and improve their health risk. PURPOSE: To examine the potential for new male-friendly, physical activity and healthy living program — Hockey Fans in Training (Hockey FIT) — to help overweight/obese men decrease their weight, waist circumference (WC), and body mass index (BMI), after 12 weeks. METHODS: A pilot, pragmatic randomized controlled trial (RCT) whereby male fans (35-65 years; BMI ≥ 28 kg/m2) of 2 Junior A hockey clubs (Ontario, Canada) were randomized to either the intervention (Hockey FIT) or comparator (wait-list control). Hockey FIT involved 12 weekly, 90-minute group sessions delivered by trained coaches using club facilities. Each session combined classroom activities, including evidence- based behaviour change techniques (e.g., self-monitoring, goal setting) and healthy eating advice (e.g., reducing portions), with physical activity training. Lifestyle prescriptions, including incremental step count targets, were also prescribed each week. We examined between-group differences in mean weight loss, WC, and BMI using linear mixed effects regression models that accounted for club and age. RESULTS: Baseline characteristics were similar between groups [total N = 80, median (interquartile range) — i) age: 48.0 (17.0) years; ii) weight: 112.2 (23.2) kg; iii) WC: 119.3 (13.5) cm; iv) BMI: 35.1 (6.3) kg/m2]. Of the 40 men in the Hockey FIT group, 30 (75%) attended at least 6 sessions. At 12 weeks, the Hockey FIT group lost more weight than the control group [difference between groups in mean weight change (control is reference): -3.6 (95% confidence interval: -5.2 to -1.9) kg, p<0.001]. The Hockey FIT group also saw greater reductions in WC and BMI, when compared to the control group [difference between groups in mean i) WC: -2.8 (-5.0 to -0.6) cm, p=0.01; ii) BMI: -0.9 (-1.4 to -0.4) kg/m2, p<0.001]. CONCLUSION: Hockey FIT has the potential to help overweight/obese men lose weight and improve health risk. A definite RCT is warranted with long-term follow-up.

Item Type:Conference Proceedings
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Gray, Dr Lucinda and Wyke, Professor Sally and Hunt, Professor Kathryn and Bunn, Dr Christopher
Authors: Petrel, R. J., Gill, D. P., De Cruz, A., Riggin, B., Muise, S., Pulford, R., Bartol, C., Hunt, K., Wyke, S., Gray, C., Bunn, C., Treweek, S., Zwarenstein, M., Zou, G., and Danyichuk, K.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO Unit
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
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