Real Time Observation Of The Ultrasound Stimulated Disintegration Of Optically Trapped Microbubbles In Proximity To Biological Cells

Prentice, P. , MacDonald, M. P., Cuschieri, A., Dholakia, K. and Campbell, P. (2005) Real Time Observation Of The Ultrasound Stimulated Disintegration Of Optically Trapped Microbubbles In Proximity To Biological Cells. In: Optical Trapping and Optical Micromanipulation II, Bellingham, WA, USA, 31 Jul - 4 Aug 2005, 59300H. (doi:10.1117/12.615012)

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Abstract

Cells that are exposed to varying amounts of ultrasonic energy in the presence of ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) may undergo either permanent cell membrane damage (lethal sonoporation ), or a transient enhancement of membrane permeability (reversible or non lethal sonoporation ). The merits of each mode are clear; lethal sonoporation constitutes a significant tumour therapy weapon, whilst its less intrusive counterpart, reversible sonoporation, represents an effective non-invasive targeted drug delivery technique. Our working hypothesis for understanding this problem was that the root cause and effect in sonoporation involves the interaction of individual cells with single microbubbles, and to that end we devised an experiment that facilitates video rate observation of this specific scenario under well defined optical control. Specifically, we have constructed an innovative hybridization apparatus involving holographic optical trapping of single and multiple UCA microbubbles, together with the facility to irradiate with MHz pulsed ultrasound energy in the presence cancerous cells. This approach allows the isolation of a target microbubble from a resident population and the relocation to a [controllable] predetermined position relative to a cell within a monolayer. Frame extraction from standard framing rate video microscopy demonstrates the individuality of single microbubble-cell interactions. We describe a fluorescence microscopy protocol that will allow future study of the potential to deliver molecular species to cells, the dependence of the delivery on the initial microbubble-cell distance and to determine the targeted cell survival.

Item Type:Conference Proceedings
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Prentice, Dr Paul
Authors: Prentice, P., MacDonald, M. P., Cuschieri, A., Dholakia, K., and Campbell, P.
College/School:College of Science and Engineering > School of Engineering > Systems Power and Energy
ISSN:0277-786X
Published Online:26 August 2005

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