Spatial analysis and identification of environmental risk factors affecting the distribution of Indoplanorbis and Lymnaea species in semi-arid and irrigated areas of Haryana, India

Sangwan, A.K., Jackson, B., De Glanville, W., Pfeiffer, D.U. and Stevens, K.B. (2016) Spatial analysis and identification of environmental risk factors affecting the distribution of Indoplanorbis and Lymnaea species in semi-arid and irrigated areas of Haryana, India. Parasite Epidemiology and Control, 1(3), pp. 252-262. (doi: 10.1016/j.parepi.2016.05.005)

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Abstract

Fasciolosis, amphistomosis and schistosomosis, transmitted by the freshwater snail species Indoplanorbis and Lymnaea, are important snail-borne diseases in India as they affect the entire spectrum of domestic animals causing substantial mortality and economic loss. Identifying any heterogeneity in the spatial distribution of these snail-borne diseases will allow for targeted disease control and efficient use of resources. The objectives of this study were threefold: (i) to describe and explore the spatial distribution of Indoplanorbis and Lymnaea in Rohtak and Jhajjar districts of Haryana, India (ii) to identify factors associated with occurrence of these freshwater snail species and (iii) to produce a map showing the predicted risk of occurrence of Lymnaea and Indoplanorbis spp. in the study area. Snails were collected from water bodies of 99 settlements out of a total of 453 in the study area. Kernel smoothing was used to generate a kernel ratio map while Kulldorff's spatial scan statistic was used to detect clusters of settlements with a high/low risk. Multivariable logistic regression showed that snails were almost ten times more likely to be present in rice-growing areas than in those not growing rice (OR 9.24) and that snails were less likely to be present with each 1 km increase in distance from a canal (OR 0.86). The regression model was used to produce a map illustrating the predicted risk of snail occurrence. Since the distribution of vector snails mirrors the distribution of snail-borne parasitic diseases, such spatial analysis helps to determine the relative risk of snail-infestation as well as snail-borne diseases' distribution and planning of control activities.

Item Type:Articles
Keywords:India
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:De Glanville, Dr William
Authors: Sangwan, A.K., Jackson, B., De Glanville, W., Pfeiffer, D.U., and Stevens, K.B.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
Journal Name:Parasite Epidemiology and Control
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:2405-6731
ISSN (Online):2405-6731
Published Online:08 June 2016
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2016 Elsevier
First Published:First published in Parasite Epidemiology and Control 1(3):252-262
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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