The creative economy invention of a global orthodoxy

Schlesinger, P. (2017) The creative economy invention of a global orthodoxy. Innovation: The European Journal of Social Science Research, 30(1), pp. 73-90. (doi:10.1080/13511610.2016.1201651)

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Abstract

This essay considers how policy thinking about culture has been steadily transformed into an overwhelmingly economic subject matter whose central trope is the “creative economy”. The development of current ideas and their background are discussed. Policy ideas first fully developed in the UK have had a global resonance: the illustrative examples of the European Union and the United Nations are discussed. The embedding of creative economy thinking in British cultural institutions such as the BBC and cultural support bodies is illustrated. The impact of current orthodoxy on academic institutions and research is also considered. Countervailing trends are weak. New thinking is now required.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:Also published as a CREATe Working Paper 2016/12 http://www.create.ac.uk/publications/the-creative-economy-invention-of-a-global-orthodoxy/
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Schlesinger, Professor Philip
Authors: Schlesinger, P.
College/School:College of Arts > School of Culture and Creative Arts > Theatre Film and TV Studies
Journal Name:Innovation: The European Journal of Social Science Research
Publisher:Taylor and Francis
ISSN:1351-1610
ISSN (Online):1469-8412
Published Online:14 July 2016
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2016 The Author
First Published:First published in Innovation: The European Journal of Social Science Research 30(1):73-90
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License
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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
610401Supporting Creative Business: The Cultural Enterprise Office and its clients.Philip SchlesingerArts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)AH/K002570/1CCA - THEATRE FILM AND TV STUDIES