Metacognition in first-episode psychosis and its association with positive and negative symptom profiles

Trauelsen, A. M., Gumley, A. , Jansen, J. E., Pedersen, M. B., Nielsen, H.-G. L., Trier, C. H., Haahr, U. H. and Simonsen, E. (2016) Metacognition in first-episode psychosis and its association with positive and negative symptom profiles. Psychiatry Research, 238, pp. 14-23. (doi:10.1016/j.psychres.2016.02.003) (PMID:27086205)

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Abstract

There is growing evidence that metacognitive abilities which include the ability to synthesize knowledge regarding mental states in self and others and use this ability to solve problems are impaired in non-affective psychosis and associated with positive and negative symptom severity. We sought to (a) investigate the severity of metacognitive impairments in first-episode psychosis (FEP) compared to non-clinical controls and (b) explore associations with positive and negative symptom profiles. Ninety-seven people with FEP were compared to 101 control persons. Metacognition was assessed with interviews and the Metacognitive assessment scale-abbreviated. Four groups based on positive and negative symptoms were identified by cluster analysis and compared on metacognition, childhood adversities, duration of untreated psychosis and premorbid social and academic adjustment. Those with high levels of negative symptoms had poorer metacognitive abilities. Those with high positive and low negative symptoms did not have poorer metacognitive abilities than those with low positive and negative symptoms. None of the other predictors differed between the groups. The FEP group had poorer metacognitive abilities than the control group. Inclusion of metacognition in psychosis models may improve our understanding of negative symptoms, while previous findings of a relation with positive symptoms may have been confounded. Implications for current interventions are discussed.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:The study was supported by The Regional Health and Research Foundation, Zealand (A.M.T. Grant number 1295); and The Lundbeck Foundation (A.M.T. Grant number R93-A8804).
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Gumley, Professor Andrew
Authors: Trauelsen, A. M., Gumley, A., Jansen, J. E., Pedersen, M. B., Nielsen, H.-G. L., Trier, C. H., Haahr, U. H., and Simonsen, E.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
Journal Name:Psychiatry Research
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0165-1781
Published Online:06 February 2016

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