'And those who live, how shall I tell their fame?' Historical pageants, collective remembrance and the First World War, 1919-39

Bartie, A., Fleming, L., Freeman, M., Hulme, T., Readman, P. and Tupman, C. (2017) 'And those who live, how shall I tell their fame?' Historical pageants, collective remembrance and the First World War, 1919-39. Historical Research, 90(249), pp. 636-661. (doi:10.1111/1468-2281.12189)

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Abstract

This article examines the ways in which the First World War was represented in historical pageants during the interwar period. Pageants in this period are often overlooked as sites of commemoration and dramatic representation. Three types of pageant are identified: those that portrayed the war hyper-realistically, those which relied on symbolism and allegory to convey messages about war and peace, and those which sought to incorporate the war into the longer histories of the communities whose pasts they depicted. The article argues that ‘traditional’ forms of representation of the past proved to be resilient features of popular commemoration and remembrance.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Fleming, Dr Linda and Freeman, Dr Mark
Authors: Bartie, A., Fleming, L., Freeman, M., Hulme, T., Readman, P., and Tupman, C.
College/School:College of Social Sciences > School of Social and Political Sciences > Economic and Social History
Journal Name:Historical Research
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:0950-3471
ISSN (Online):1468-2281
Published Online:08 June 2017
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 The Authors
First Published:First published in Historical Research 90(249):636-661
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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