The association between physical activity and risk of mortality is modulated by grip strength and cardiorespiratory fitness: evidence from 498 135 UK-Biobank participants

Celis-Morales, C. A. , Lyall, D. M. , Anderson, J. , Iliodromiti, S., Fan, Y., Ntuk, U. E., Mackay, D. F. , Pell, J. P. , Sattar, N. and Gill, J. M.R. (2017) The association between physical activity and risk of mortality is modulated by grip strength and cardiorespiratory fitness: evidence from 498 135 UK-Biobank participants. European Heart Journal, 38(2), pp. 116-122. (doi:10.1093/eurheartj/ehw249) (PMID:28158566)

Celis-Morales, C. A. , Lyall, D. M. , Anderson, J. , Iliodromiti, S., Fan, Y., Ntuk, U. E., Mackay, D. F. , Pell, J. P. , Sattar, N. and Gill, J. M.R. (2017) The association between physical activity and risk of mortality is modulated by grip strength and cardiorespiratory fitness: evidence from 498 135 UK-Biobank participants. European Heart Journal, 38(2), pp. 116-122. (doi:10.1093/eurheartj/ehw249) (PMID:28158566)

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Abstract

Aims: It is unclear whether the potential benefits of physical activity differ according to level of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) or strength. The aim of this study was to determine whether the association between physical activity and mortality is moderated by CRF and grip strength sufficiently to inform health promotion strategies. Methods and results: 498 135 participants (54.7% women) from the UK Biobank were included (CRF data available in 67 702 participants). Exposure variables were grip strength, CRF, and physical activity. All-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease (CVD) events were the outcomes. 8591 died over median 4.9 years [IQR 4.3–5.5] follow-up. There was a significant interaction between total physical activity and grip strength (P < 0.0001) whereby the higher hazard of mortality associated with lower physical activity was greatest among participants in the lowest tertile for grip strength (hazard ratio, HR:1.11 [95% CI 1.09–1.14]) and lowest among those in the highest grip strength tertile (HR:1.04 [1.01–1.08]). The interaction with CRF did not reach statistical significance but the pattern was similar. The association between physical activity and mortality was larger among those in the lowest tertile of CRF (HR:1.13 [1.02–1.26]) than those in the highest (HR:1.03 [0.91–1.16]). The pattern for CVD events was similar. Conclusions: These data provide novel evidence that strength, and possibly CRF, moderate the association between physical activity and mortality. The association between physical activity and mortality is strongest in those with the lowest strength (which is easily measured), and the lowest CRF, suggesting that these sub-groups could benefit most from interventions to increase physical activity.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Celis, Dr Carlos and Ntuk, Uduakobong Efanga and Gill, Professor Jason and Iliodromiti, Dr Stamatina and Anderson, Dr Jana and Pell, Professor Jill and Mackay, Dr Daniel and Sattar, Professor Naveed and Lyall, Dr Donald
Authors: Celis-Morales, C. A., Lyall, D. M., Anderson, J., Iliodromiti, S., Fan, Y., Ntuk, U. E., Mackay, D. F., Pell, J. P., Sattar, N., and Gill, J. M.R.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Public Health
Journal Name:European Heart Journal
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0195-668X
ISSN (Online):1522-9645
Published Online:06 July 2016
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2016 Oxford University Press
First Published:First published in European Heart Journal 38(2): 116-122
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher
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