The relationship between self-reported sensory experiences and autistic traits in the general population: a mixed methods analysis

Robertson, A. E. and Simmons, D. R. (2018) The relationship between self-reported sensory experiences and autistic traits in the general population: a mixed methods analysis. Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 33(3), pp. 182-192. (doi:10.1177/1088357616667589)

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Abstract

There have been few examples of inductive research in sensory reactivity, particularly in relation to autistic traits among the general population. This study used a mixed methods approach to explore the nature of sensory experiences among people with different levels of autistic traits. Participants completed the Glasgow Sensory Questionnaire and the Autism Spectrum Quotient. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses were performed on the data. Responses to the open questions were analyzed as part of this study, and the closed questionnaire data have been reported elsewhere. Data were coded and responses quantitatively compared by group. In addition, data were qualitatively analyzed using a general inductive approach, which resulted in two themes: “problematic sensory experiences” and “calming sensory experiences.” Results show that coping mechanisms and certain aspects of the sensory experience vary according to autistic trait level, and provide insight into the nature of sensory reactivity across the general population.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Simmons, Dr David
Authors: Robertson, A. E., and Simmons, D. R.
College/School:College of Science and Engineering > School of Psychology
Journal Name:Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities
Publisher:SAGE Publications
ISSN:1088-3576
ISSN (Online):1538-4829
Published Online:31 August 2016
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2016 Hammill Institute on Disabilities
First Published:First published in Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities 33(3):182-192
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

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