Morphological, ecological and behavioural differentiation of sympatric profundal and pelagic Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) in Loch Dughaill Scotland

Hooker, O.E., Barry, J., Van Leeuwen, T.E., Lyle, A., Newton, J. , Cunningham, P. and Adams, C.E. (2016) Morphological, ecological and behavioural differentiation of sympatric profundal and pelagic Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) in Loch Dughaill Scotland. Hydrobiologia, 783(1), pp. 209-221. (doi:10.1007/s10750-015-2599-0)

Hooker, O.E., Barry, J., Van Leeuwen, T.E., Lyle, A., Newton, J. , Cunningham, P. and Adams, C.E. (2016) Morphological, ecological and behavioural differentiation of sympatric profundal and pelagic Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) in Loch Dughaill Scotland. Hydrobiologia, 783(1), pp. 209-221. (doi:10.1007/s10750-015-2599-0)

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Abstract

Phenotypic variation in populations of fishes that inhabit postglacial lakes is often associated with trophic specialisations. A common sympatric foraging divergence seen in Arctic charr is into either plankton or littoral-zoobenthos feeding specialisms. In this study, we report a sympatric polymorphic Arctic charr population which is not centred on this divergence but instead manifests as a plankton (pelagic)—profundal zoobenthos foraging specialisms. The head shape of profundal fish was round and robust, the body thick set and pectoral fins long and wide. In contrast, the head of pelagic fish was pointed and slender, the body fusiform in shape and with short, narrow pectoral fins. There was no difference between profundal and pelagic fish in gill raker number. Body lipid content was significantly higher in pelagic fish as were the number or Diphyllobothrium cysts. The carbon isotope ratio was more heavily depleted in profundal fish. There was no dietary overlap in the prey items recovered from stomach contents of profundal and pelagic fish. We suggest the proximate driver behind the sympatric divergence was the successful exploitation of the profundal zone. The consequences of this have led to the development of adaptations in morphology and behaviour to support and maintain this divergence.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Van Leeuwen, Dr Travis and Newton, Dr Jason and Barry, Professor J and Adams, Professor Colin and Lyle, Mr Alexander
Authors: Hooker, O.E., Barry, J., Van Leeuwen, T.E., Lyle, A., Newton, J., Cunningham, P., and Adams, C.E.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
College of Science and Engineering > Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre
Journal Name:Hydrobiologia
Publisher:Springer International Publishing
ISSN:0018-8158
ISSN (Online):1573-5117
Published Online:03 February 2016
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2016 The Authors
First Published:First published in Hydrobiologia 783(1): 209-221
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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