Physical activity is prospectively associated with adolescent nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

Anderson, E. L., Fraser, A., Howe, L. D., Callaway, M. P., Sattar, N. , Day, C., Tilling, K. and Lawlor, D. A. (2016) Physical activity is prospectively associated with adolescent nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 62(1), pp. 110-117. (doi:10.1097/mpg.0000000000000904) (PMID:26252921) (PMCID:PMC4697952)

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Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the present study was to assess whether objectively measured physical activity at mean ages 12 and 14 years are prospectively associated with ultrasound scan liver fat and stiffness (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase [AST], and [gamma]-glutamyl transferase [GGT]) assessed at mean age 17.8 years. Methods: Participants were from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Total physical activity (counts per minute) and minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were measured using ActiGraph accelerometers at mean ages 12 and 14 years. Results: Greater total physical activity and MVPA at ages 12 and 14 years were associated with lower odds of liver fat and lower GGT levels at mean age 17.8 years, such as per 15-minute increase in daily MVPA at age 12 years, the confounder adjusted odds ratio of liver fat was 0.47 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.27–0.84). Associations attenuated after additional adjustment for fat mass as a potential confounder (eg, per 15-minute increase in daily MVPA at age 12 years, the odds ratio of liver fat attenuated to 0.65 [95% CI 0.35–1.21]) or a potential mediator (eg, per 15-minute increase in daily MVPA at age 12 years the odds ratio of liver fat attenuated to 0.59 [95% CI 0.32–1.09]). Results did not further attenuate after additional adjustment for insulin resistance. There was some evidence that greater total physical activity and MVPA at age 12 years were associated with the higher AST levels. Conclusions: Adolescents who were more active in childhood have lower odds of fatty liver and lower GGT levels. These findings are likely to be, at least in part, explained by adiposity.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Sattar, Professor Naveed
Authors: Anderson, E. L., Fraser, A., Howe, L. D., Callaway, M. P., Sattar, N., Day, C., Tilling, K., and Lawlor, D. A.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
Journal Name:Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0277-2116
ISSN (Online):1536-4801
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2015 European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology
First Published:First published in Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition 62(1): 110-117
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
565111Modifiable early life determinants of adolescent NAFLD and its association with metabolic and vascular traitsNaveed SattarBritish Heart Foundation (BHF)PG/11/33/28794RI CARDIOVASCULAR & MEDICAL SCIENCES
494152The utility of biomarkers for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in adolescentsNaveed SattarMedical Research Council (MRC)G0801456/88195RI CARDIOVASCULAR & MEDICAL SCIENCES