Analysis of size effect on strength of quasi-brittle materials using integral-type nonlocal models

Havlasek, P., Grassl, P. and Jirásek, M. (2016) Analysis of size effect on strength of quasi-brittle materials using integral-type nonlocal models. Engineering Fracture Mechanics, 157, pp. 72-85.

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Abstract

The influence of the averaging operator of nonlocal continuum damage models near specimen boundaries on the size effect on strength of quasibrittle materials is investigated. Two phenomenological approaches, namely standard rescaling and distance-based models, are considered. The numerical results are compared to data from three-point bending tests of notched and unnotched beams recently reported in the literature. It is shown that both approaches can reproduce the experiments well for one type of geometry with one set of input parameters. However, only the distance-based model provides a good agreement for both unnotched and notched beams with the same set of parameters.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Grassl, Dr Peter and Havlasek, Mr Petr
Authors: Havlasek, P., Grassl, P., and Jirásek, M.
College/School:College of Science and Engineering > School of Engineering
College of Science and Engineering > School of Engineering > Infrastructure and Environment
Journal Name:Engineering Fracture Mechanics
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0013-7944
ISSN (Online):1873-7315
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2016 The Authors
First Published:First published in Engineering Fracture Mechanics 157:72-85
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
566601SAFE - a Systems Approach For Engineered BarriersPeter GrasslEngineering & Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)EP/I036427/1ENG - ENGINEERING INFRASTRUCTURE & ENVIR