Quality of life impact of childhood skin conditions measured using the children’s dermatology life quality index (CDLQI): a meta-analysis

Olsen, J. R. , Gallacher, J., Finlay, A. Y., Piguet, V. and Francis, N. A. (2016) Quality of life impact of childhood skin conditions measured using the children’s dermatology life quality index (CDLQI): a meta-analysis. British Journal of Dermatology, 174(43), pp. 853-861. (doi:10.1111/bjd.14361) (PMID:26686685)

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Abstract

Background: The Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI) is the most widely used instrument for measuring the impact of skin disease on quality of life (QoL) in children. Objective: Provide a meta-analysis of all published quality of life (QoL) scores for a range of childhood skin conditions. Methods: Studies using the Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI) questionnaire to measure QoL in skin conditions were identified by searching Medline and Embase from January 1995 (CDLQI creation) to December 2014. Studies were grouped according to condition and baseline scores were combined using meta-analysis. Results: 67 studies using the CDLQI met the inclusion criteria. The overall estimated CDLQI scores for conditions reported more than once were: atopic eczema (Point Estimate 8.5 (95% CI 7.1-9.8), number of studies = 38, score range = 0-29), acne (5.3 (1.9-8.5), n=5, 0-30), alopecia (3.1 (0-7.7), n=2, 0-6), molluscum contagiosum (3.5 (0.6-6.7), n=5, 0-27), psoriasis (8.0 (3.9-12.1), n=6, 0-29), scabies (9.2 (0.0-20.3), n=2, 1-26), urticaria (7.1 (0-15.4), n=2, 0-22), vitiligo (6.5 (0.7-12.2), n=2, 0-20), and warts (2.9 (0-5.8), n=4, 0-16). Overall, the mean effect on QoL (weighted average CDLQI score 4.6 (95% CI 3.9 to 5.4)) for children with these conditions was small. However, many children were found to experience a very large impact on QoL (34% of children with atopic eczema, 10% with molluscum contagiosum and 1 - 5% with acne) in studies where the distributions of scores were provided. Conclusions: Most skin conditions in children have a “small” mean effect on quality of life. However, the range is large and a significant proportion of children with many common skin conditions will experience a very large effect on quality of life.

Item Type:Articles (Other)
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Olsen, Dr Jonathan
Authors: Olsen, J. R., Gallacher, J., Finlay, A. Y., Piguet, V., and Francis, N. A.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Public Health
Journal Name:British Journal of Dermatology
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
ISSN:0007-0963
ISSN (Online):1365-2133
Published Online:06 March 2016
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2015 ritish Association of Dermatologists
First Published:First published in British Journal of Dermatology 174(4):853-861
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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