Micro-moves in international relations theory

Solomon, T. and Steele, B. J. (2017) Micro-moves in international relations theory. European Journal of International Relations, 23(2), pp. 267-291. (doi:10.1177/1354066116634442)

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Abstract

This article posits empirical and political reasons for recent ‘micro-moves’ in several contemporary debates, and seeks to further develop them in future International Relations studies. As evidenced by growing trends in studies of practices, emotions, and the everyday, there is continuing broad dissatisfaction with grand or structural theory’s value without ‘going down’ to ‘lower levels’ of analysis where structures are enacted and contested. We suggest that empirics of the last fifteen years – including the war on terror and the Arab Spring – have pushed scholars into increasingly micropolitical positions and analytical frameworks. Drawing upon insights from Gilles Deleuze, William Connolly, and Henri Lefebvre, among others, we argue that attention to three issues – affect, space, and time – hold promise to further develop micropolitical perspectives on and in IR, particularly on issues of power, identity, and change. The article offers empirical illustrations of the analytical purchase of these concepts via discussion of the Occupy Wall Street movement and the Arab Spring uprisings.

Item Type:Articles (Other)
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Solomon, Dr Ty
Authors: Solomon, T., and Steele, B. J.
Subjects:J Political Science > JA Political science (General)
J Political Science > JC Political theory
J Political Science > JZ International relations
College/School:College of Social Sciences > School of Social and Political Sciences > Politics
Journal Name:European Journal of International Relations
Publisher:SAGE Publications
ISSN:1354-0661
ISSN (Online):1460-3713
Published Online:07 March 2016
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2016 The Authors
First Published:First published in European Journal of International Relations 23(2):267-291
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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