Cardiometabolic disease and features of depression and bipolar disorder: population-based, cross-sectional study

Martin, D. J. et al. (2016) Cardiometabolic disease and features of depression and bipolar disorder: population-based, cross-sectional study. British Journal of Psychiatry, 208(4), pp. 343-351. (doi:10.1192/bjp.bp.114.157784) (PMID:26795427)

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Publisher's URL: http://bjp.rcpsych.org/content/early/2016/01/09/bjp.bp.114.157784

Abstract

Background: The relative contribution of demographic, lifestyle and medication factors to the association between affective disorders and cardiometabolic diseases is poorly understood. Aims: To assess the relationship between cardiometabolic disease and features of depresion and bipolar disorder within a large population sample. Method: Cross-sectional study of 145 991 UK Biobank participants: multivariate analyses of associations between features of depression or bipolar disorder and five cardiometabolic outcomes, adjusting for confounding factors. Results: There were significant associations between mood disorder features and ‘any cardiovascular disease’ (depression odds ratio (OR) = 1.15, 95% CI 1.12–1.19; bipolar OR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.14–1.43) and with hypertension (depression OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.13–1.18; bipolar OR = 1.26, 95% CI 1.12–1.42). Individuals with features of mood disorder taking psychotropic medication were significantly more likely than controls not on psychotropics to report myocardial infarction (depression OR = 1.47, 95% CI 1.24–1.73; bipolar OR = 2.23, 95% CI 1.53–3.57) and stroke (depression OR = 2.46, 95% CI 2.10–2.80; bipolar OR = 2.31, 95% CI 1.39–3.85). Conclusions: Associations between features of depression or bipolar disorder and cardiovascular disease outcomes were statistically independent of demographic, lifestyle and medication confounders. Psychotropic medication may also be a risk factor for cardiometabolic disease in individuals without a clear history of mood disorder.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Martin, Dr Daniel and Gill, Professor Jason and Smith, Professor Daniel and Nicholl, Dr Barbara and Evans, Professor Jonathan and Cullen, Dr Breda and Mackay, Dr Daniel and Pell, Professor Jill
Authors: Martin, D. J., Ul-Haq, Z., Nicholl, B. I., Cullen, B., Evans, J., Gill, J. M. R., Roberts, B., Gallacher, J., Mackay, D., McIntosh, A., Hotopf, M., Craddock, N., Deary, I. J., Pell, J. P., and Smith, D. J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Public Health
Journal Name:British Journal of Psychiatry
Publisher:Royal College of Psychiatrists
ISSN:0007-1250
ISSN (Online):1472-1465
Published Online:21 January 2016

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