Increasing physical activity in stroke survivors using STARFISH, an interactive mobile phone application: a pilot study

Paul, L., Wyke, S. , Brewster, S. , Sattar, N. , Gill, J. M.R. , Alexander, G., Rafferty, D., McFadyen, A. K., Ramsay, A. and Dybus, A. (2016) Increasing physical activity in stroke survivors using STARFISH, an interactive mobile phone application: a pilot study. Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, 23(3), pp. 170-177. (doi:10.1080/10749357.2015.1122266) (PMID:27077973)

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Abstract

Background: Following stroke, people are generally less active and more sedentary which can worsen outcomes. Mobile phone applications (apps) can support change in health behaviours. We developed STARFISH, a mobile phone app-based intervention, which incorporates evidence-based behaviour change techniques (feedback, self-monitoring and social support), in which users’ physical activity is visualised by fish swimming. Objective: To evaluate the potential effectiveness of STARFISH in stroke survivors. Method: Twenty three people with stroke (12 women; age: 56.0 ± 10.0 years, time since stroke: 4.2 ± 4.0 years) from support groups in Glasgow completed the study. Participants were sequentially allocated in a 2:1 ratio to intervention (n=15) or control (n=8) groups. The intervention group followed the STARFISH programme for six weeks; the control group received usual care. Outcome measures included physical activity, sedentary time, heart rate, blood pressure, body mass index, Fatigue Severity Scale, Instrumental Activity of Daily Living Scale, Ten Metre Walk Test, Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale, Psychological General Well-Being Index. Results: The average daily step count increased by 39.3% (4158 to 5791 steps/day) in the intervention group and reduced by 20.2% (3694 to 2947 steps/day) in the control group (p=0.005 for group-time interaction). Similar patterns of data and group-time interaction were seen for walking time (p=0.002) and fatigue (p= 0.003). There were no significant group-time interactions for other outcome measures. Conclusion: Use of STARFISH has the potential to improve physical activity and health outcomes in people after stroke and longer term intervention trials are warranted.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor and Francis in Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation on 2016, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/10.1080/10749357.2015.1122266
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Wyke, Professor Sally and Dybus, Dr Aleksandra and Ramsay, Mr Andrew and Gill, Professor Jason and Brewster, Professor Stephen and Sattar, Professor Naveed and Paul, Dr Lorna
Authors: Paul, L., Wyke, S., Brewster, S., Sattar, N., Gill, J. M.R., Alexander, G., Rafferty, D., McFadyen, A. K., Ramsay, A., and Dybus, A.
Subjects:R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Social Scientists working in Health and Wellbeing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Nursing and Health Care
College of Science and Engineering > School of Computing Science
Journal Name:Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation
Publisher:Taylor and Francis
ISSN:1074-9357
ISSN (Online):1945-5119
Published Online:08 January 2016
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2016 Taylor and Francis
First Published:First published in Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation 23(3):170-177
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
619991Increasing physical activity in stroke survivors using STARFISH, an interactive mobile phone applicationLorna PaulChest, Heart & Stroke, Scotland (CHSS)Res146(Exec3008SM - NURSING & HEALTHCARE