Effects of a beverage rich in (poly)phenols on established and novel risk markers for vascular disease in medically uncomplicated overweight or obese subjects: A four week randomized trial

Mullan, A., Delles, C. , Ferrell, W., Mullen, W. , Edwards, C. A. , McColl, J. H. , Roberts, S. A. and Lean, M. (2016) Effects of a beverage rich in (poly)phenols on established and novel risk markers for vascular disease in medically uncomplicated overweight or obese subjects: A four week randomized trial. Atherosclerosis, 246, pp. 169-176. (doi:10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2016.01.004) (PMID:26797134)

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Abstract

Objective: To determine if (poly)phenols alter cardiovascular risk factors, we assessed the potential of a high (poly)phenol beverage drink, rich in hydroxycinnamates and flavonoids, to modify vascular function in middle aged, overweight or obese subjects without medical co-morbidity in a randomized placebo controlled pilot study. Methods: Randomly assigned active 250 ml beverages containing 361 mg of (poly)phenols and 120 mg of vitamin C or placebo (no polyphenol/vitamin C) were taken twice daily for 4 weeks. Both beverages contained 40 kcals/250 ml. The primary end-points were pulse wave velocity (PWV) and cutaneous microvascular responses to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and acetyl choline (ACh) laser doppler iontophoresis. A range of established and novel plasma markers were also measured. Results: Twenty subjects received active beverage and 19 placebo; all completed the study. There was no difference in cutaneous vascular response to either SNP or ACh with mean group differences (logD area under perfusion curve) of 0.30 (0.65, 1.26) and 0.35 (0.11, 0.81) respectively. Nor was there evidence of a change in log PWV with a mean group difference of 0.029 m/s (0.042, 0.10). No significant differences were seen in plasma leptin, apolipoproteins, cystatin C, insulin, adiponectin, CRP, ICAM-1, E-Selectin or tPA, but IL-6 increased in active versus placebo recipients (0.32 vs e 0.18 pg/ml; p ¼ 0.010). Conculsion: There was no evidence for a short-term beneficial effect of (poly)phenol intervention on microcutaneous vascular response or pulse wave velocity, and no evidence for a benefit on established or novel risk factors in overweight or obese subjects. Our results do not support a short-term benefit of (poly)phenol supplementation on cardiometabolic risk.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Lean, Professor Michael and Delles, Professor Christian and Mullan, Dr Adam and McColl, Professor John and Mullen, Dr William and Edwards, Professor Christine and Ferrell, Professor William
Authors: Mullan, A., Delles, C., Ferrell, W., Mullen, W., Edwards, C. A., McColl, J. H., Roberts, S. A., and Lean, M.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
College of Science and Engineering > School of Mathematics and Statistics > Statistics
Journal Name:Atherosclerosis
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0021-9150
ISSN (Online):1879-1484
Published Online:06 January 2016
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2016 Elsevier
First Published:First published in Atherosclerosis 246:169-176
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.

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