Lasting EEG/MEG aftereffects on human brain oscillations after rhythmic transcranial brain stimulation: Level of control over oscillatory network activity

Veniero, D., Vossen, A., Gross, J. and Thut, G. (2015) Lasting EEG/MEG aftereffects on human brain oscillations after rhythmic transcranial brain stimulation: Level of control over oscillatory network activity. Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience, 9, 477. (doi:10.3389/fncel.2015.00477) (PMID:26696834) (PMCID:PMC467822)

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Publisher's URL: http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fncel.2015.00477/full

Abstract

A number of rhythmic protocols have emerged for non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) in humans, including transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation (otDCS) and repetitive (also called rhythmic) transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). With these techniques, it is possible to match the frequency of the externally applied electromagnetic fields to the intrinsic frequency of oscillatory neural population activity ("frequency-tuning"). Mounting evidence suggests that by this means tACS, otDCS, and rTMS can entrain brain oscillations and promote associated functions in a frequency-specific manner, in particular during (i.e. online to) stimulation. Here, we focus instead on the changes in oscillatory brain activity that persist after the end of stimulation. Understanding such aftereffects in healthy participants is an important step for developing these techniques into potentially useful clinical tools for the treatment of specific patient groups. Reviewing the electrophysiological evidence in healthy participants, we find aftereffects on brain oscillations to be a common outcome following tACS/otDCS and rTMS. However, we did not find a consistent, predictable pattern of aftereffects across studies, which is in contrast to the relative homogeneity of reported online effects. This indicates that aftereffects are partially dissociated from online, frequency-specific (entrainment) effects during tACS/otDCS and rTMS. We outline possible accounts and future directions for a better understanding of the link between online entrainment and offline aftereffects, which will be key for developing more targeted interventions into oscillatory brain activity.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Thut, Professor Gregor and Gross, Professor Joachim and Veniero, Dr Domenica
Authors: Veniero, D., Vossen, A., Gross, J., and Thut, G.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology
Journal Name:Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience
Publisher:Frontiers Research Foundation
ISSN:1662-5102
ISSN (Online):1662-5102
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2015 The Authors
First Published:First published in Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience 9:477
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
597051Natural and modulated neural communication: State-dependent decoding and driving of human Brain Oscillations.Joachim GrossWellcome Trust (WELLCOME)098433/Z/12/ZINP - CENTRE FOR COGNITIVE NEUROIMAGING
597911Natural and modulated neural communication: State-dependent decoding and driving of human Brain OscillationsGregor ThutWellcome Trust (WELLCOME)098434/Z/12/ZINP - CENTRE FOR COGNITIVE NEUROIMAGING