Supporting Today’s and Tomorrow’s Learners: Innovative Ideas for Student Development

Dale, V., Whittlestone, K., Kydd, J. and Totemeyer, S. (2011) Supporting Today’s and Tomorrow’s Learners: Innovative Ideas for Student Development. The 2nd Veterinary Education Symposium, Nottingham, UK, 13-14 July 2011.

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Abstract

The increasing emphasis on self-directed learning in the health professions, in order to produce effective lifelong learners means that today’s veterinary students can no longer rely solely on the study skills developed at secondary school, such as rote memorisation of facts or basic concepts. Students are required to apply knowledge, and analyse and synthesise information, in order to solve complex clinical problems. The increasing recognition of the importance of facilitating ‘deep’ learning is mirrored in the ‘new’ curricula established in recent years at a number of veterinary schools, including those in London and Nottingham. These changes have important implications for the way that learners are supported throughout their professional training. Anecdotally, it has been observed that a number of students struggle by the time they reach the third year of the veterinary course, which has a greater clinical focus, when they realise that tried and tested methods of learning and revision – such as re-writing lecture notes – no longer work for them. It is at this point that many students – especially those with specific learning difficulties such as dyslexia – approach learning support officers and tutors for help and advice. It can be difficult at this stage to encourage students to relinquish their study habits in favour of alternative strategies that promote active learning. International students can also present issues regarding support. The purpose of this workshop will be to encourage participants to think about the learning needs of their own students, to reflect on the nature and scope of learning support currently being provided and to consider some alternative strategies for supporting successful, self-directed learning from the outset of their professional training.

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Dale, Dr Vicki
Authors: Dale, V., Whittlestone, K., Kydd, J., and Totemeyer, S.
College/School:University Services > Learning and Teaching Services Division

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