The effect of feeding a low- or a high-starch diet on the in vitro fermentative capacity of equine faecal inocula

Murray, J.M.D. , Longland, A., Moore-Colyer, M. and Dunnett, C. (2006) The effect of feeding a low- or a high-starch diet on the in vitro fermentative capacity of equine faecal inocula. Animal Science, 82(05), pp. 627-635. (doi: 10.1079/ASC200683)

Full text not currently available from Enlighten.

Abstract

Seven mature Welsh-cross pony geldings provided the faecal inocula in a cross-over design experiment, consisting of two 14-day periods. In period 1, four ponies (group 1) were offered a low-starch fibre mix (LS), and three (group 2) were offered a conventional high-starch coarse mix (HS). Both groups were offered these mixes in a 50:50 ratio with mature grass hay, to give a total daily dry-matter intake of 17·5 g/kg live weight per day. Diets were then switched in period 2. At the end of each experimental period freshly voided faeces were collected from each animal and assessed for their ability to ferment grass hay (H), fibre mix (FMix) or starch-based coarse mix (SMix) using the gas production (GP) technique of Theodorou et al. (1994). Donor animal diet and donor animal had no effect on any end-point measurements. Lag times recorded for the SMix were significantly (P<0·001) greater in LS-inoculated bottles compared with the HS inocula (1·74 v. 2·25 h, respectively). Lag times for FMix and SMix varied significantly (P<0·001) between ponies (0·82 to 1·78 h in the FMix and 1·64 to 2·51 h in the SMix). The degradation rate of H also differed significantly (P<0·001) between ponies with the time taken to reach 50% of GP (T50) ranging from 12·70 to 17·30 h. Consequently, it would appear that the effect of feeding LS or HS on the in vitro fermentative capacity of equine faecal inocula is minimal; moreover, the GP technique appears to be valuable tool for evaluating such effects.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Murray, Professor Jo-Anne
Authors: Murray, J.M.D., Longland, A., Moore-Colyer, M., and Dunnett, C.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine
Journal Name:Animal Science
Publisher:Cambridge University Press
ISSN:1357-7298
ISSN (Online):1748-748X

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record