Cognitive function and lifetime features of depression and bipolar disorder in a large population sample: Cross-sectional study of 143,828 UK Biobank participants

Cullen, B. et al. (2015) Cognitive function and lifetime features of depression and bipolar disorder in a large population sample: Cross-sectional study of 143,828 UK Biobank participants. European Psychiatry, 30(8), pp. 950-958. (doi:10.1016/j.eurpsy.2015.08.006) (PMID:26647871)

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Abstract

Background: This study investigated differences in cognitive performance between middle-aged adults with and without a lifetime history of mood disorder features, adjusting for a range of potential confounders. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from the UK Biobank cohort. Adults aged 40–69 (n = 143,828) were assessed using measures of reasoning, reaction time and memory. Self-reported data on lifetime features of major depression and bipolar disorder were used to construct groups for comparison against controls. Regression models examined the association between mood disorder classification and cognitive performance, adjusting for sociodemographic, lifestyle and clinical confounders. Results: Inverse associations between lifetime history of bipolar or severe recurrent depression features and cognitive performance were attenuated or reversed after adjusting for confounders, including psychotropic medication use and current depressive symptoms. Participants with a lifetime history of single episode or moderate recurrent depression features outperformed controls to a small (but statistically significant) degree, independent of adjustment for confounders. There was a significant interaction between use of psychotropic medication and lifetime mood disorder features, with reduced cognitive performance observed in participants taking psychotropic medication. Conclusions: In this general population sample of adults in middle age, lifetime features of recurrent depression or bipolar disorder were only associated with cognitive impairment within unadjusted analyses. These findings underscore the importance of adjusting for potential confounders when investigating mood disorder-related cognitive function.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Martin, Dr Daniel and Smith, Professor Daniel and Nicholl, Dr Barbara and Evans, Professor Jonathan and Cullen, Dr Breda and Mackay, Dr Daniel and Pell, Professor Jill
Authors: Cullen, B., Nicholl, B.I., Mackay, D.F., Martin, D., Ul-Haq, Z., McIntosh, A., Gallacher, J., Deary, I..J., Pell, J.P., Evans, J.J., and Smith, D.J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Public Health
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
Journal Name:European Psychiatry
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0924-9338
ISSN (Online):1778-3585
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2015 Elsevier
First Published:First published in European Psychiatry 30(8):950-958
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.

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